Conjugate lateral gaze
The term gaze is frequently used in physiology to describe coordinated motion of the eyes and neck. The lateral gaze is controlled by the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF). The vertical gaze is controlled by the rostral interstitial nucleus of medial longitudinal fasciculus and the interstitial nucleus of Cajal.

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Abnormal Horizontal Gaze: Clinical…
Horizontal-gaze abnormalities are more common than vertical ones. Because the horizontal-gaze system depends on unilateral gaze centers and pathways, it is more ...
telemedicine.orbis.org/bins/volume_page.asp?cid=1-2630-2743-4633
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Conjugate gaze palsy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
[edit]. Horizontal gaze palsies affect gaze of both eyes either toward or away from the midline of the body. Horizontal ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugate_gaze_palsy
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Gaze (physiology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The lateral gaze is controlled by the paramedian pontine reticular formation ( PPRF). ... The conjugate gaze is the motion of both eyes in the same direction at the ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaze_(physiology)
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Conjugate eye movement - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Conjugate eye movement refers to motor coordination of the eyes that allows for ... Horizontal conjugate gaze is controlled by the nuclei of CN III and CN VI, the ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugate_eye_movement
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conjugategaze - eneurosurgery
A disorder of conjugate gaze means that patients are unable to look in certain directions with both eyes, such as upward, downward or laterally. Patients with ...
www.eneurosurgery.com/conjugategaze.html
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Pure motor hemiplegia with conjugate lateral gaze palsy in pontine ...
Although Conjugate lateral gaze palsy is also hypothesized, pure motor hemiplegia with Conjugate lateral gaze palsy has never been reported. We present a ...
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8967115
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Conjugate Gaze Palsies: Neuro-ophthalmologic and Cranial Nerve ...
A conjugate gaze palsy is inability to move both eyes in a single horizontal (most ... Conjugate horizontal gaze is controlled by neural input from the cerebral ...
www.merckmanuals.com/professional/neurologic_disorders/neuro-ophthalmologic_and_cranial_nerve_disorders/conjugate_gaze_palsies.html
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conjugate gaze abnormalities - General Practice Notebook
In a brainstem lesion there is ipsilateral paralysis of horizontal conjugate gaze and a frontal lobe lesion causes contralateral paralysis of horizontal conjugate ...
www.gpnotebook.co.uk/simplepage.cfm?ID=-1483079676
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Horizontal gaze palsy - MedLink
Apr 1, 2013 ... In familial congenital paralysis of horizontal gaze (Sharpe et al 1975; Yee et al 1982; Stavrou and Willshaw 1999), all horizontal conjugate eye ...
www.medlink.com/web_content/MLT000UX.asp
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Conjugate Gaze - SpringerReference
The eyes can look laterally (left/right), upward, or downward. Disorders in conjugate gaze refer to the inability to look in a certain direction with both eyes.
www.springerreference.com/docs/html/chapterdbid/184078.html
Search results for "Conjugate lateral gaze"
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Conjugate lateral gaze in science
Horizontal gaze palsy - MedLink
Apr 1, 2013 ... Dr. Moss of the University of Illinois at Chicago has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. ... Horizontal gaze palsy is due to lesions of the pons. ... are not gaze palsies, as they do not involve conjugate eye movements.
Ocular Motor Control (Section 3, Chapter 8) Neuroscience Online ...
The result is an abnormality of conjugate horizontal eye movements called lateral gaze paralysis. With the eyes at rest, there is a medial strabismus in the eye ...
[PDF]Pure Motor Hemiplegia with Conjugate Lateral Gaze Palsy in ...
Conjugate lateral gaze Palsy is also hyPothesized, Pure motor hemiPlegia with Conjugate lateral gaze ... tute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul,.
Chapter 4: Eye movements
This is because, in the position of lateral gaze, the superior and inferior rectus muscles are in line ... These include voluntary, conjugate horizontal gaze ( looking side-to-side); voluntary, conjugate .... New York, Oxford University Press, 1969.
Review - Horizontal Gaze - Ophthalmology - Stanford University
Feb 16, 2012 ... 1. What structures are involved in conjugate horizontal gaze and where are they located? 2. What prevents spurious horizontal saccades? 3.
Conjugate gaze palsy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Conjugate gaze palsies can be classified into palsies affecting horizontal gaze and vertical gaze. .... "University of Western Ontario Department of Physiology.
Pure motor hemiplegia with conjugate lateral gaze palsy in pontine ...
Department of Neurology and Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of ... Although Conjugate lateral gaze palsy is also hypothesized, pure motor ...
Possible mechanisms for horizontal gaze deviation and ...
Dept. of Neurology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia ... We report a patient who developed conjugate horizontal gaze deviation and ...
Complete bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis disclosing multiple ...
Brain MRI, performed while the bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis existed, showed a few ... A complete unilateral gaze paralysis for all conjugate lateral eye movements may ..... OXFORD UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS NHS TRUST CONSULTANT ...
MR Imaging of Brain-Stem Hypoplasia in Horizontal Gaze Palsy with ...
Summary: We present the MR imaging findings of a girl with horizontal gaze palsy and ... HGPPS is a rare congenital disorder characterized by absence of conjugate horizontal eye movements and .... University of New South Wales,2003 .
Books on the term Conjugate lateral gaze
Fundamentals of Neurology: An Illustrated Guide
Fundamentals of Neurology: An Illustrated Guide
Marco Mumenthaler, Heinrich Mattle, 2006
Horizontal Gaze Palsy A patient with horizontal gaze palsy cannot make a conjugate movement of the eyes to the right, to the left, or (rarely) in either direction. The causative lesion may be at any of several sites in the central nervous system: ...
First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2013 (First Aid USMLE)
First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2013 (First Aid USMLE)
Vikas Bhushan, 2012
THE WORLD'S BESTSELLING MEDICAL REVIEW BOOK--WITH MORE THAN 1,200 FREQUENTLY TESTED FACTS AND MNEMONICS Conveniently organized by organ system and general principles 125+ color clinical photographs integrated throughout the text Hundreds of full-color illustrations clarify essential concepts and improve retention Rapid-review section for last-...
The Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma
The Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma
Fred Plum, Jerome B. Posner, 1982
Abnormalities of Lateral Gaze. Most lateral conjugate gaze disorders occurring in unconscious patients result from destructive lesions since neither compressive nor metabolic disorders usually affect the supranuclear oculomotor pathways ...
Bates' Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, 10th Edition
Bates' Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, 10th Edition
2008
The Tenth Edition of this classic text provides the best foundation for performing physical examinations and taking patient history. The book features a beautiful full-color art program and a clear, simple two-column format, with highly visual step-by-step examination techniques on the left and abnormalities with differential diagnoses on the right...
Stroke Syndromes, 3ed
Stroke Syndromes, 3ed
Louis R. Caplan, Jan van Gijn, 2012
Conjugate horizontal gaze and Vlth nerve palsies Fibers from the cerebral hemisphere frontal eye fields that relate to voluntary horizontal conjugate gaze directed toward the contralateral side descend in the internal capsule and cross in the ...
CURRENT Medical Diagnosis and Treatment 2014 (LANGE CURRENT Series)
CURRENT Medical Diagnosis and Treatment 2014 (LANGE CURRENT Series)
Michael W. Rabow, 2013
Turn the latest research into improved patient outcomes with the #1 annual guide to internal medicine and clinical practice Written by clinicians renowned in their respective fields, CMDT offers the most current insight into symptoms, signs, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment for more than 1,000 diseases and disorders. You'll find concise,...
Clinical Anatomy for Students: Problem Solving Approach
Clinical Anatomy for Students: Problem Solving Approach
Neeta V. Kulkarni, 2007
90.10: Neural control of eye movement in Conjugate lateral gaze. 'A' is diagrammatic representation of nerve supply of medial rectus (MR) and lateral rectus (LR) muscles of eyeball. Note that internuclear fibers arising in para- abducent ...
Medical Physiology, 2e Updated Edition: with STUDENT CONSULT Online Access, 2e (MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGY (BORON))
Medical Physiology, 2e Updated Edition: with STUDENT CONSULT Online Access, 2e (MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGY (BORON))
2011
"Highly Commended," Basic and Clinical Sciences Category, British Medical Association 2012 Medical Book CompetitionQuickly review important content using prominent boxes included throughout the text to provide clinical examples of disordered physiology. Master difficult concepts with the use of 800 color drawings that feature balloon capt...
Neuroanatomy
Neuroanatomy
James D. Fix, 2008
Lateral rectus muscle — Medial rectus subnucleus ofCN Midbrain Rons Nucleus of CN VI Bilateral MLF syndrome Right Convergence Patient with MLF syndrome cannot adduct the eye on attempted lateral conjugate gaze and has nystagmus ...
First Aid Q&A for the USMLE Step 1, Third Edition (First Aid USMLE)
First Aid Q&A for the USMLE Step 1, Third Edition (First Aid USMLE)
James A. Feinstein, 2012
1,000 questions and answers prepare you for the USMLE Step 1! The only comprehensive Q&A review for the USMLE Step directly linked to high-yield facts from Dr. Le's First Aid for the USMLE Step 1, this essential study guide offers 1000 board-style questions and answers, easy-to-navigate, high yield explanations for correct and incorrect an...
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Blog posts on the term
Conjugate lateral gaze
MR Imaging Features of Brain Stem Hypoplasia in Familial Horizontal Gaze Palsy and Scoliosis
www.ajnr.org/content/27/6/1382.full
cerebellar hemorrhage and conjugate eye gaze - USMLE Forums
cerebellar hemorrhage and conjugate eye gaze USMLE Step 2 CK Forum
www.usmle-forums.com/usmle-step-2-ck-forum/26216-cerebellar-hemorrhage-conjugate-eye-gaze.html
Profile of Gaze Dysfunction following Cerebrovascular Accident
ISRN Ophthalmology is a peer-reviewed, open access journal that publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of ophthalmology.
www.hindawi.com/isrn/ophthalmology/2013/264604/
BRAIN TUMORS 2 | Atul choube speaks
CLINICAL FEATURES : These result from blockage of CSF circulation leading to increased intracranial pressure or from focal damage to brain parenchyma . In young infants increased intracranial pressure is the only clue to neoplasms . Focal neurological signs usually occur before IIP in supratentorial neoplasms but in slowly growing tumors focal neurological signs may…
atulchoube.wordpress.com/2013/06/22/brain-tumors-2/
Why is there ipsilateral gaze preference in middle cerebral artery stroke? | Brain Stories
The middle cerebral artery (MCA) can be divided into 2 main territories, the superior and inferior. If MCA stem is occluded, this will results in complete MCA syndrome which one will be presented with hemiplegia, hemisensory loss, hemianopsia, temporary ipsilateral gaze palsy, and global aphasia (if on dorminant side) or hemi-neglect (non-dorminant). If the superior…
teddybrain.wordpress.com/2013/04/08/why-is-there-ipsilateral-gaze-preference-in-middle-cerebral-artery-stroke/
Chapter 197 – Disorders of Supranuclear Control of Ocular Motility | Free Medical Textbook
Chapter 197 - Disorders of Supranuclear Control of Ocular Motility PATRICK J.M. LAVIN SEAN P. DONAHUE DEFINITION • Loss of voluntary saccades (fast) and pursuit (slow) eye movements may result from interruption of neural pathways that carry commands from the cerebral cortex to the ocular motor nuclei in the…
medtextfree.wordpress.com/2011/02/28/chapter-197-disorders-of-supranuclear-control-of-ocular-motility/
Neurology page: Localization of Nystagmus.
Vestibular nystagmus Vestibular nystagmus may be central or peripheral. Important differentiating features between central and peripheral nystagmus include the following: peripheral nystagmus is unidirectional with the fast phase opposite the lesion; central nystagmus may be unidirectional or bidirectional; purely vertical or torsional nystagmus suggests a central location; central vestibular nystagmus is not dampened or inhibited by visual fixation; tinnitus or deafness often is present in peripheral vestibular nystagmus, but it usually is absent in central vestibular nystagmus.
pankajjalan.blogspot.com/2012/05/localization-of-nystagmus.html
Version–Vergence Interactions during Memory-Guided Binocular Gaze Shifts
www.iovs.org/content/54/3/1656.full
My Thesis | Inessah Selditz
Interaction Designer, Brooklyn
inessah.com/thesis/
Frontiers in Zoology | Full text | The optic chiasm: a turning point in the evolution of eye/hand coordination
The primate visual system has a uniquely high proportion of ipsilateral retinal projections, retinal ganglial cells that do not cross the midline in the optic chiasm. The general assumption is that this developed due to the selective advantage of accurate depth perception through stereopsis. Here, the hypothesis that the need for accurate eye-forelimb coordination substantially influenced the evolution of the primate visual system is presented. Evolutionary processes may change the direction of retinal ganglial cells. Crossing, or non-crossing, in the optic chiasm determines which hemisphere receives visual feedback in reaching tasks. Each hemisphere receives little tactile and proprioceptive information about the ipsilateral hand. The eye-forelimb hypothesis proposes that abundant ipsilateral retinal projections developed in the primate brain to synthesize, in a single hemisphere, visual, tactile, proprioceptive, and motor information about a given hand, and that this improved eye-hand coordination and optimized the size of the brain. If accurate eye-hand coordination was a major factor in the evolution of stereopsis, stereopsis is likely to be highly developed for activity in the area where the hands most often operate.
www.frontiersinzoology.com/content/10/1/41
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