Greek gods and their Roman and Etruscan counterparts
Interpretatio graeca (Latin, "Greek translation" or "interpretation by means of Greek [models]") is a discourse in which ancient Greek religious concepts and practices, deities, and myths are used to interpret or attempt to understand the mythology and religion of other cultures. It is thus a comparative methodology that looks for equivalencies and shared characteristics. The phrase may describe Greek efforts to explain others' beliefs and myths, as when Herodotus describes Egyptian religion in terms of perceived Greek analogues, or when Dionysius of Halicarnassus and Plutarch document Roman cults, temples, and practices under the names of equivalent Greek deities. Interpretatio graeca may also describe non-Greeks' interpretation of their own belief systems by comparison or assimilation with Greek models, as when Romans adapt Greek myths and iconography under the names of their own gods.
Interpretatio romana is comparative discourse in reference to ancient Roman religion and myth, as in the formation of a distinctive Gallo-Roman religion. Both the Romans and the Gauls reinterpreted Gallic religious traditions in relation to Roman models, particularly Imperial cult.
Jan Assmann considers the polytheistic approach to internationalizing gods as a form of "intercultural translation":
Pliny the Elder expressed the "translatability" of deities as "different names to different peoples" (nomina alia aliis gentibus). This capacity made possible the religious syncretism of the Hellenistic era and the pre-Christian Roman Empire.

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Etruscan Gods and Their Roman Counterparts - Gregory Flood's ...
Gregory Flood's Etruscan Gods and Their Roman Counterparts. Etruscan counterparts of Roman gods and goddesses compiled by Gregory Flood.
ancienthistory.about.com/od/romangods/a/101910-Etruscan-Gods-And-Their-Roman-Counterparts.htm
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Interpretatio graeca - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The similarity of gods makes their names mutually translatable. ... in the linguistic transformation of Greek Heracles to Etruscan Her[e]cle to Roman Hercules.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpretatio_graeca
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List of Etruscan mythological figures - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Many of the names are Etruscan spellings (and pronunciations) of Greek names. The themes may ... Etruscans frequently added their own themes to Greek myths. The same ..... The Roman god, Mars, is believed to have come from this name.
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Etruscan_mythological_figures
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Interpretatio graeca | Facebook
Interpretatio graeca may also describe non-Greeks' interpretation of their own ... Greek gods and their Roman and Etruscan counterparts was merged with this ...
www.facebook.com/pages/Interpretatio-graeca/139360859415092?rf=143772335638509
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Etruscan Religion - The Mysterious Etruscans
Feb 14, 2006 ... The obvious Eastern Greek influence in Etruscan religion and art from ... of the highest God, Tinia (or Jupiter as he became known to the Romans). ... If slaves shall do this, they shall be moved to a lower status by their owner.
www.mysteriousetruscans.com/religion.html
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Discovering Etruscan and Greek Influences on Roman Civilizations
Etruscans, the forebears of the Romans, made their home there for over 900 years, .... The Etruscans believed the Gods gave them signs embedded in nature and .... Unlike their Greek counterparts, Etruscan charioteers were strapped to their ...
www.mitchellteachers.org/WorldHistory/AncientRome/DiscoveringEtruscanGreekInfluences.htm
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Roman Deities - Timeless Myths
The Roman had modelled their gods from the Greeks. ... just confine to the pantheon of the Roman/Latin, Greek and Etruscan.
www.timelessmyths.com/classical/roman.html
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Roman Mythology - the gods of the Romans and Etruscans
We've attempted to point out the Greek vs Roman equivalents and hopefully ... the Etruscans or Etrurians seemed to have lived life to the full if their frescoes and  ...
www.godchecker.com/pantheon/roman-mythology.php
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Roman and Greek Gods and Goddesses…
Roman and Greek names for the Olympians and the minor gods and goddesses.
ancienthistory.about.com/od/romangods/a/022709RomanGrk.htm
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Roman and Greek God Comparisons…
Roman Gods and Goddesses . In the beginning Roman gods were considered divine manifestations, faceless, formless, and powerful. The idea of gods as anthropomorphized ...
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Greek gods and their Roman and Etruscan counterparts in science
List of Etruscan mythological figures - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Many of the names are Etruscan spellings (and pronunciations) of Greek names. The themes may or may not be entirely Greek. Etruscans frequently added their own themes to Greek myths. ..... The Roman god, Mars, is believed to have come from this name. Pallottino ..... University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology.
Interpretatio graeca - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The similarity of gods makes their names mutually translatable. ... the linguistic transformation of Greek Heracles to Etruscan Her[e]cle to Roman Hercules. .... The Memory of Egypt in Western Monotheism (Harvard University Press, 1997), pp.
Roman mythology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Roman mythology is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome's ... stories about Greek deities under the names of their Roman counterparts. ... relationship with Etruscan religion, less documented than that of the Greeks. .... T.P. Wiseman, The Myths of Rome (University of Exeter Press, 2004), preface ( n.p.).
List of Roman deities - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Some archaic deities have Italic or Etruscan counterparts, as identified both by ancient ... influence of Greek mythology, contributed to a tendency in Latin literature to ... Of those listed, he writes, "several names have their roots in both languages, ..... "Roman Gods," Roman and European Mythologies (University of Chicago ...
Roman Gods
the only Roman god who was essentially identical to his Greek counterpart ... an Etruscan goddess of obscure origins worshipped from the earliest times in Rome ... They took a vow of chastity for the duration of their service, and the penalty for ...
Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2008.04.26
Apr 26, 2008 ... London and Austin, TX: British Museum Press and the University of ... list of Etruscan gods alongside their Greek and Roman equivalents (78).
Roman gods lesson plans - free eBooks download - GoBookee.org
th Grade Lesson Plan —— It's Greek to Me: Greek Mythology. Hera's Roman name is Juno, ... Names for Roman Gods, Some Etruscan Gods and Their Roman Counterparts, Gods and ... Ancient Rome - University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point.
Foreign Influences on Roman Religion - MusesRealm.Net
The Romans gained some of their religious ideas from the Etruscans, who were fond of nature deities. ... Not all of the Greek gods had Roman equivalents, such as Apollo, and were brought ... University of California Press: Los Angeles, 1987.
Etruscan Religion - The Mysterious Etruscans
Feb 14, 2006 ... The obvious Eastern Greek influence in Etruscan religion and art ... highest God, Tinia (or Jupiter as he became known to the Romans). ... To judge by their range of studies they were a kind of university with several faculties.
Etruscan,Roman,Tuscany,Florence & Italy - Pinterest
Minerva (Etruscan: Menrva) was the Roman goddess whom Romans from the 2nd century BC ... He is the god of sky and thunder in Greek mythology. His Roman counterpart is Jupiter and Etruscan counterpart is Tinia. ... B.C., although the Etruscans maintained their own language until about the first century B.C. By the first ...
Books on the term Greek gods and their Roman and Etruscan counterparts
Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend
Etruscan Myth, Sacred History, and Legend
Nancy Thomson De Grummond, 2006
Other major deities have their similarities to and differences from their Greek and Roman counterparts, and looking at these comparisons will help us to define the nature of deity in Etruria. It is also instructive to look at some of the stories that ...
Deceived: Corrupt Leadership and the American Empire
Deceived: Corrupt Leadership and the American Empire
Marlin Creasote, 2007
The Greeks believed that the Gods controlled all aspects of their lives and that they would be punished for pride, ambition, or excessive wealth. With no official ... Rome adapted their religion; the Roman gods all had Etruscan counterparts.
Indo-European Sacred Space: Vedic and Roman Cult
Indo-European Sacred Space: Vedic and Roman Cult
Roger D. Woodard, 2006
The list of Greek gods and their Etrus— can and Roman counterparts which Cornell presents (cited above) suggests independent Etruscan and Roman processes of interpretatio. Other such equivalencies, however, reveal that Etruscans ...
Culture and Values: A Survey of the Humanities, Volume I
Culture and Values: A Survey of the Humanities, Volume I
Lawrence S. Cunningham
The Romans devoured the Greek gods along with Greek literature, sculpture, and architecture. ... The Greeks could never have imagined the building boom they inspired throughout the empire, and how their gods would be integrated with ... In the case of Christianity, a period of persecution was followed by the emperor Constantine's V 4.12 Etruscan, Greek, and Roman Counterparts of Gods and Heroes.
A History of Roman Art, Enhanced Edition
A History of Roman Art, Enhanced Edition
Fred S. Kleiner, 2010
78 MARS OF TODI The Etruscan statue most closely conforming to the Classical style of Greek statuary is the nearly life-size bronze statue of a warrior wearing a cuirass ... The statue does not, however, represent Mars, the Roman god of war, or his Etruscan counterpart Laran. ... It is probably the product of a sculptural workshop in Orvieto (Etruscan Velzna, Roman Volsinii), famed for its bronze- casters.
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Blog posts on the term
Greek gods and their Roman and Etruscan counterparts
Goddesschess: Oops! Etruscan Man Actually A Woman
Oh my, falling off my chair laughing as archaeologist Judith Weingarten (check out her fabulous blog Zenobia: Empress of the East) tugs the whiskers of the hoary old establishment for its original conclusions about the occupants of a certain intact tomb discovered in Tarquinia. A must read! Here is Tia Ghose's story on the er, gender error, at Live Science:Oops! Etruscan Warrior Prince Really a PrincessBy Tia Ghose, Staff Writer Last month, archaeologists announced a stunning find: a completely sealed tomb cut into the rock in Tuscany, Italy.
goddesschess.blogspot.com/2013/10/oops-etruscan-man-actually-woman.html
Padanian-American League: Etruscan Mythology and Religion: Part 1 of 2
I wanted to make one thing clear to start with. Now that all of the posts from the old Lombardian-American blog have been merged here, as well as many existing posts regarding the history of the ancient Lombards, it could give one the impression of some type of "Lombardophile" concept here.
pamle.blogspot.com/2009/05/etruscan-mythology-and-religion-part-1.html
DOCUMENTARY MAGIC: Clash of the Gods - Zeus the Olympian - Greek Mythology - Repost
In the ancient Greek religion, Zeus (Ancient Greek: Ζεύς, Zeús; Modern Greek: Δίας, Días) is the "Father of Gods and men" (πατὴρ ἀνδρῶν τε θεῶν τε, patḕr andrōn te theōn te)[3] who rules the Olympians of Mount Olympus as a father rules the family. He is the god of sky and thunder in Greek mythology. His Roman counterpart is Jupiter, Hindu counterpart is Indra and Etruscan counterpart is Tinia. Zeus is the child of Cronus and Rhea, and the youngest of his siblings. In most traditions he is married to Hera, although, at the oracle of Dodona, his consort is Dione: according to the Iliad, he is the father of Aphrodite by Dione.[2] He is known for his erotic escapades. These resulted in many godly and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo and Artemis, Hermes, Persephone (by Demeter), Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses (by Mnemosyne); by Hera, he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe and Hephaestus.[4] As Walter Burkert points out in his book, Greek Religion, "Even the gods who are not his natural children address him as Father, and all the gods rise in his presence."[5] For the Greeks, he was the King of the Gods, who oversaw the universe. As Pausanias observed, "That Zeus is king in heaven is a saying common to all men".[6] In Hesiod's Theogony Zeus assigns the various gods their roles. In the Homeric Hymns he is referred to as the chieftain of the gods. His symbols are the thunderbolt, eagle, bull, and oak. In addition to his Indo-European inheritance, the classical "cloud-gatherer" also derives certain iconographic traits from the cultures of the Ancient Near East, such as the scepter. Zeus is frequently depicted by Greek artists in one of two poses: standing, striding forward, with a thunderbolt leveled in his raised right hand, or seated in majesty.
www.documentarymagic.com/2013/02/clash-of-gods-zeus-olympian-greek.html
Did the Romans “steal” the Greek gods? | Lucus Antiquus
This post...I have typed and retyped it over and over again, and it still doesn't seem quite right. But I'm rolling with it. If there is one sure-fire way to raise the hackles of a Roman Reconstructionist, it is to state that the Romans stole the Greek gods for their own use and gave them…
romanpolytheist.wordpress.com/2012/10/11/did-the-romans-steal-the-greek-gods/
Who were the Etruscans? | experimentsinfilmandmixedmedia
Italy’s first civilization, the Etruscans, inhabited central Italy after the first millennium BCE. Known as Tyrrhenians to the Greeks and Tusci to the Romans, there are many theories as to Etruscan origin. Herodotus believed that they emigrated “from Lydia in Asia Minor and that King Tyrsenos was their leader,” while Dionysus of Halicarnassus wrote that…
experimentsinfilmandmixedmedia.wordpress.com/2013/10/13/who-were-the-etruscans/
Can you name the gods that are the Greek equivalents? Quiz - Sporcle Games & Trivia
Play the Greek God or Roman Rip-Off Quiz on Sporcle, the best trivia and game site on the web!
www.sporcle.com/games/bazmerelda/greek-god-or-roman-rip-off
Prime 12 Olympian Greek Gods | Mylifescoop.Net
]]>The Twelve Olympians, in Greek mythology, were the principal gods of the Greek pantheon, residing atop Mount Olympus. The Twelve Olympians gained their supremacy in the planet of gods immediately after Zeus led his siblings to victory in war with the Titans.
www.mylifescoop.net/knowledge-base/prime-12-olympian-greek-gods/
Gods and Goddesses: the Immortals depicted on Roman oil lamps | FOLLOWING HADRIAN
While on a four day trip to explore the Limes Germanicus, I ended up visiting the Staatliche Antikensammlungen (Museum of antiquities) and the Glyptothek in Munich due to poor weather conditions.The Museum of antiquities in Munich is currently hosting the “Immortal - Gods of Greece” exhibition. This one-year-round exhibition (now extended to 19 January 2014) presents a vibrant range of divine…
followinghadrian.wordpress.com/2013/06/10/gods-and-goddesses-the-immortals-depicted-on-roman-oil-lamps/
Young Archaeologists and Ancient Etruscans or what to call your rabbit | Ancient Worlds
In mid-January the first of the Manchester Museum's Young Archaeologists Club meetings for 2013 took place. We were scratching our heads wondering what to do because it was too cold to take the children out on a site digging and we had already talked about the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians in previous sessions. However, there was…
ancientworldsmanchester.wordpress.com/2013/02/26/young-archaeologists-and-ancient-etruscans-or-what-to-call-your-rabbit/
Ngozi Gold: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE OLYMPIC FLAME...A PAGAN CELEBRATION?..I DUNNO..FIND OUT!
The Olympic Flame is a symbol of the Olympic Games. The burning flame Commemorates the theft of fire from the Greek god Zeus by Prometheus, its origins lie in ancient Greece, where a fire was kept burning throughout the celebration of the ancient Olympics.
www.ngozigold.com/2012/08/the-significance-of-olympic-flamea.html
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