Gregorian Church
The Armenian Apostolic Church (Armenian: Հայ Առաքելական Սուրբ Եկեղեցի, Hay Aṙak̕elakan Surp Yekeġetsi, officially Armenian: Հայաստանեայց Առաքելական Սուրբ Եկեղեցի, Hayastaniayts Aṙak̕elakan Surp Yekeġetsi) is the world's oldest national church. It is part of Oriental Orthodoxy and is one of the most ancient Christian communities.Armenia was the first country to adopt Christianity as its official religion in AD 301, in establishing this church. The Armenian Apostolic Orthodox Church claims to trace its origins to the missions of Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus in the 1st century and is an early center of Christianity.
It is sometimes referred to as the Gregorian Church but this name is not preferred by the church itself, as it views the Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus as its founders, and St. Gregory the Illuminator as merely the first official governor of the church.

This is an excerpt from the article Gregorian Church from the Wikipedia free encyclopedia. A list of authors is available at Wikipedia.
The article Gregorian Church at en.wikipedia.org was accessed 44 times in the last 30 days. (as of: 05/15/2014)
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Gregorian TV
Get program schedule and watch Gregorian TV online. Affliated with the Parumala Church.
orthodoxchurch.tv/
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Armenian Apostolic Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is sometimes referred to as the Gregorian Church but this name is not preferred by the church itself, as it views the Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus as its ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Apostolic_Church
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Gregorian Reform - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
[edit]. The reform of the Church, both within it, and in relation to the Holy Roman Emperor and the other lay rulers of ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_Reform
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Gregorian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Armenian Apostolic Church, sometimes called the Gregorian Church after Saint Gregory the Illuminator; The Gregorian telescope, named after James ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian
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Religion in Lebanon - Armenian Orthodox or Gregorian
The Gregorian Church was organized in the third century and became autocephalous as a national church in the fourth century. In the sixth century it modified ...
atheism.about.com/library/FAQs/islam/countries/bl_LebanonArmenian.htm
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Gregorian Church - Encyclopedia - The Free Dictionary
one of the oldest Christian churches. Christianity began to be disseminated in Armenia in the early centuries of the Christian era. In A.D. 301 KingTiridates III ...
encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Gregorian+Church
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St. Peter's - Gregorian Chapel
The Gregorian Chapel is named after its patron Gregory XIII. It contains the tombs of Benedict XIV and Gregory XVI. The three altars here are: St. Basil, Madonna ...
saintpetersbasilica.org/Altars/GregorianChapel/GregorianChapel.htm
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Gregorian Church | Facebook
Gregorian Church. 3 likes · 0 talking about this. redirect Armenian Apostolic Church.
www.facebook.com/pages/Gregorian-Church/106258916077785
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Armenian Church | Infoplease.com
Armenian Church, autonomous Christian church, sometimes also called the Gregorian Church. Its head, a primate of honor only, is the catholicos of Yejmiadzin, ...
www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/society/armenian-church.html
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Gregorian calendar - Wikipedia, the free…
The Gregorian calendar, also called the Western calendar and the Christian calendar, is internationally the most widely accepted and used civil calendar. It has been ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar
Search results for "Gregorian Church"
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Gregorian Church in science
Head of Rome's Gregorian University seeks trust, respect from Vatican
Aug 1, 2013 ... "The church is not a kind of ideological structure," said Dumortier, who heads Rome's Pontifical Gregorian University, which the Jesuits have ...
History Curriculum at the Gregorian University - Wikipedia, the free ...
The Faculty of History and the Cultural Patrimony of the Church was created at the Gregorian University to investigate and understand the history and the life of ...
Pontifical Gregorian University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Pontifical Gregorian University (Italian: Pontificia Università Gregoriana; also ... the site was transferred to a larger facility behind the church of San Stefano ...
Famous Latinist fired from Gregorian University, announces new ...
Oct 18, 2006 ... Famous Latinist fired from Gregorian University, announces new school ... of the University of Notre Dame in the Church of the Sacred Heart in ...
Visit to the Pontifical Gregorian University - La Santa Sede
Nov 3, 2006 ... Together with the Gregorian University, they form a prestigious academic ... Even when, as in Canon Law and in Church History, the immediate ...
Gregorian University Foundation: Who We Are
The Gregorian University Foundation: Supporting The Pontifical Gregorian ... professors and students gather from all parts of the world to serve the Church ...
Gregorian University Foundation: Events
A British Jesuit, Norman Tanner is Professor of Church History at the Gregorian University. His latest book is the New Short History of the Catholic Church (Burns  ...
Gregorian University Press, Rome - paxbook.com
Acta Nuntiaturae Gallicae, The 16 volumes published to date by the Faculty of Church History of the Pontifical Gregorian University with the collaboration of the  ...
Gregorian University Foundation - Jesuits
Feb 15, 2013 ... “Serving the universal church as president of the Gregorian University Foundation is a great opportunity to give myself to the mission of the ...
The Pontifical Gregorian University Website
Pontifical Gregorian University, PUG, IHS, Home Page. ... Sunday 17 November at 10:30am: Mass at the Church "San Luigi dei Francesi". Upcoming Events ...
Books on the term Gregorian Church
A History of the Church in the Middle Ages
A History of the Church in the Middle Ages
F Donald Logan, 2012
"Conceptually well organized, stylistically clear, intellectually thoughtful, and pedagogically useful." - Thomas Head, Speculum "For its humane and learned approach to its enormous canvas, as well as for the cogency with which it penetrates at speed to the essentials of a vanished historical epoch, this History of the Church in the ...
The New Music Review and Church Music Review
The New Music Review and Church Music Review
1926
Benedicite Gregorian Tonus Pcrcyrmus Tones Bcnedictus Gregorian Gregurian Tones v, Tones vm Magnificat Gregorian ... The musical rendering of the service is enjoined upon no parish by canonical rule ; but for such as desire to avail ...
How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization
How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization
Thomas E. Woods, 2012
"Engaging and engrossing.... A mine of information on the debt we owe to Catholic life and thought." -- Michael P. Foley, Ph.D., assistant professor of Patristics, Great Texts Program, Baylor University"Puts the Church back where it should be: at the center of values, science, laws, and institutions of Western civilization." -- ...
Anglican Ritualism in Victorian Britain, 1830-1910
Anglican Ritualism in Victorian Britain, 1830-1910
Nigel Yates, 1999
St Thomas, Oxford P. Ancient parish church, A. restored 1846-7 L Coloured vestments Gregorian chant 100. South Leigh P. Ancient parish church, A. restored 1871-2 L Vestments, unspecified Gregorian chant Daily communion Shropthire 10 1 ...
A Beginner's Guide To Reading Gregorian Chant Notation
A Beginner's Guide To Reading Gregorian Chant Notation
Noel Jones, 2008
Noel Jones first sang chant in a choir of men and boys and followed that up by chanting daily masses as a teenager in a small town in Ohio. Summer studies with Benedictine monks took him further along the chant path prior to his leaving for New York City where he directed Catholic choirs and was organist at the Church Center for the United Nations ...
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Blog posts on the term
Gregorian Church
RedStateEclectic : The Gregorian Revolutions and the Divisibility of Freedom
Image credit. Increasingly, I come to believe it important for supporters of freedom to understand not only that liberty is divisible, but that it can only exist, grow and progress in this form. Interesting in their own right, the below stories go to show just how interwoven freedom is with unfreedom, how she grows with and out of unfreedom and creates structures both of freedom and of unfreedom. Reality is too complex to accommodate visions and hopes of a neat ultimate separation of freedom and unfreedom. This inevitable amalgamation of the opposite forces makes it harder to understand, promote, and defend freedom, for it makes the state, story, and truth of freedom more intricate and a lot harder to grasp and to convey. Yet, if her emulsive quality is ignored freedom will be even more disadvantaged by an insufficient sense of reality in its adherents. Friends of liberty ought to admit something akin to the marginal revolution, that they so benefit from in their economic reasoning, into their perception of liberty in the real world, and hence replace the crude habit of thinking in categorical dichotomies with the skill of incremental analysis. (Specifically on this last point, see also Politically Correct Nourishment - Too Much and Too Little Economics.) In the books appearing below with Amazon links, Deepak Lal argues that two papal revolutions were pivotal for the development of the West, the first giving rise to individualism, and the second producing the legal instruments that made modern free and capitalist societies possible. In 1075, Pope Gregory VII, in what Lal calls the second papal revolution, put the church above the state and through the resulting church-state created the whole legal and administrative infrastructure required by a full-fledged market economy. Before that, in the sixth century, pope Gregory I, aka Saint Gregory the Great, launched the first papal revolution that was to change the face of the western world, emancipating the individual from the extended kinship nexus: These twin papal revolutions arose because of the unintended consequences of the Church's search for bequests - a trait that goes back to its earliest days. From its inception it had grown as a temporal power through gifts and donations - particularly from rich widows. So much so that, in July 370, the Emperor Valentinian had addressed a ruling to the Pope that male clerics and unmarried ascetics should not hang around the houses of women and widows, and try to worm themselves and their churches into their bequests at the expense of the women's families and blood relations. Thus, from its very beginnings the Church was in the race for inheritances. In this respect, the early Church's extolling of virginity and preventing second marriages helped it to create more single women who would leave bequests to the Church. This process, of inhibiting a family from retaining its property and promoting its alienation accelerated [ ... when in 597] Pope Gregory I [...] overturned the traditional Mediterranean and Middle Eastern pattern of legal and customary practices in the domestic domain. The traditional system was concerned with the provision of an heir to inherit family property, and allowed marriage to close kin, marriages to close affines or widows of close kin, the transfer of children by adoption, and finally concubinage, which is a form of secondary union. Gregory banned all four practices. [...] This papal revolution made the Church unbelievably rich. Demographers have estimated that the net effect of the prohibitions on traditional methods to deal with childlessness was to leave 40 percent of families with no immediate male heirs. The Church became the chief beneficiary of the resulting bequests. [...] But this accumulation also drew predators from within and without the Church to deprive it of its acquired property. It was to deal with this denudation that Pope Gregory VII instigated his papal revolution in 1075, by putting the power of God - through the spiritual weapon of excommunication - above that of Caesar's. With the Church then entering into the realm of the world, the new church-state also created the whole administrative and legal paraphernalia which we associate with a modern economy." (Reviving the Invisible Hand, pp. 155-156) Do not forget, in those days, the Church is the only all encompassing, truly ubiquitous organisation in Europe, secular powers being strongly localised, fragmentary or of an itinerant kind, as well as far less powerful and hence less comprehensively invasive than modern government. In Reviving the Invisible Hand, classical liberal Deepak Lal explains how the West came to be - free and capitalist, and thus eventually utterly - different from the Rest: I have argued in Unintended Consequences that in the High Middle Ages there was also a change in what I have called the cosmological beliefs of the West. Cosmological beliefs concern the world view of a civilization: how people should live. They provide its moral anchor. They are transmitted through the socialization processes in childhood by harnessing the powerful emotions of shame and guilt. Most Eurasian civilizations were shame-based and had similar family values, for agrarian civilizations required stable settled families to operate their settled agriculture. To maintain this stability all these cultures sought to limit the common human but ephemeral passion of love as the basis of marriage. Their values were communalist. It was the first papal revolution of Gregory the Great in the sixth century which changed these hitherto communalist values to the individualist ones which have come to characterize and distinguish the West from the Rest. This papal revolution, by promoting love as the basis of marriage and advocating the independence of the young, led to the rise of individualism in the West [and produced the calculated effect of dissolving kinship ties and to create a wealth base for the Christian individual, many of whom would bequeath substantial assets to the Church rather than keeping them within the kin, as Lal argues; G.T.]. But to curb the dissolution of family bonds and the resulting instability in family formation this...
redstateeclectic.typepad.com/redstate_commentary/2013/11/how-romance-wrecked-traditional-marriage.html
Dhyanam By Fr Shiju T Mathai Gregorian Tv - Orthodoxchurch.tv
Dhyanam By Fr Shiju T Mathai Gregorian Tv
orthodoxchurch.tv/2013/10/26/dhyanam-by-fr-shiju-t-mathai-gregorian-tv/
Gregorian chant, a textbook for seminaries, novitiates and secondary schools (1945) - MusicaSacra Church Music Forum
forum.musicasacra.com/forum/discussion/comment/108981
4351 ~ Gregorian Chant Concert at S. Salvador Church | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
4351 ~ Gregorian Chant Concert at S. Salvador Church
www.flickr.com/photos/scarlet-poppy/10393513486/
Oommen Chandy Visit Parumala Church – 30 October 2013 | Gregorian News
orthodoxchurch.in/2013/10/31/oommen-chandy-visit-parumala-church-30-october-2013/
A Brief History of Gregorian Chant | For Christ and the Church
Why is it that so many popes have recommended Gregorian Chant during Mass? Before an answer to this question is possible (tomorrow's post), a little bit of history will be helpful. Gregorian Chant refers to the particular style of chant in Latin that developed in the early Middles Ages in the monasteries of the Holy…
andthechurch.com/2012/05/07/a-brief-history-of-gregorian-chant/
Ukrainian Catholics will not change to Gregorian calendar : News Headlines - Catholic Culture
www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=18994
Parumala Perunal 2013 – Sunday School Meeting | Gregorian News | Church News Blog
Posted on October 29, 2013 by Church News Editor.
news.churchministrycenter.com/2013/10/parumala-perunal-2013-sunday-school-meeting-gregorian-news/
New Liturgical Movement: Do We Trust the Church's Judgment—Or Our Own?
Do we trust that the Church is guiding us rightly? There are times when we ourselves see clearly that what the Church is asking of us is true and reasonable, prudent and feasible; when we have personally experienced the truth and goodness of her traditions or her precepts. In these cases, we have our own intellect and heart batting for the Church, so to speak, and obedience is not only easy, it is obvious.
www.newliturgicalmovement.org/2013/08/do-we-trust-churchs-judgmentor-our-own.html
Medieval Church History: Lesson 18 - the Gregorian Reform and the Investiture Struggle
THE GREGORIAN REFORM AND THE INVESTITURE STRUGGLE GOALS OF THE GREGORIAN REFORM a. Reaffirmation of the Papal Primacy b.
medievalchurchhistory.blogspot.com/2012/10/lesson-18-gregorian-reform-and.html
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