Hakn a tshaynik
Hakn a tshaynik (literally "to knock a teakettle"; Yiddish: האַקן אַ טשײַניק), meaning to rattle on loudly and insistently, but without any meaning, is a widely used Yiddish idiomatic phrase. It is most often used in the negative imperative sense: Hak mir nisht keyn tshaynik! (literally "Don't knock a teakettle at me!"; Yiddish: !האַק מיר נישט קיין טשײַניק), in the sense of "Stop bothering me!".
Aside from the metaphor of the subject of the epithet, making meaningless noise as if he/she were banging on a teakettle, the phrase gains from the imagery of the lid of a teakettle full of boiling water "moving up and down, banging against the kettle like a jaw in full flap, clanging and banging and signifying nothing"; ironically, the less the contents, the louder and more annoying the noise.
The phrase became familiar to many Americans without contact with Yiddish speakers by appearing in popular Three Stooges short films. In Columbia's 1936 short A Pain in the Pullman, when caught sneaking out of their rooms without paying rent, Moe tries to explain by saying, "Well, we were just on our way to hock the truck so we could pay you.", to which Larry kicks in, "Hey, hock a chynick for me too, will ya?", earning himself a swift kick in the shin.; in the other, Larry, disguised as a Chinese laundryman, pretending to speak Chinese, utters a stream of Yiddish doubletalk, ending with "Hak mir nisht keyn tshaynik, and I don't mean efsher (maybe)!" The phrase has become relatively common in English in half-translated forms such as "Don’t hock my chainik", to the point where shortened versions of the phrase, such as "You don't have to hock me about it!" proliferate on television and the movies, particularly where the speaker is intended to represent a resident of New York City, even if not Jewish.
Modern Hebrew also contains an idiomatic expression of precisely identical meaning.

This is an excerpt from the article Hakn a tshaynik from the Wikipedia free encyclopedia. A list of authors is available at Wikipedia.
The article Hakn a tshaynik at en.wikipedia.org was accessed 355 times in the last 30 days. (as of: 11/09/2013)
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Hakn a tshaynik - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hakn a tshaynik (literally "to knock a teakettle"; Yiddish: האַקן אַ טשײַניק), meaning to rattle on loudly and insistently, but without any meaning, is a widely used ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hakn_a_tshaynik
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Kettle's On! – Forward.com
Jun 5, 2008 ... Forward reader Mark Hurvitz writes in an e-mail: “The question of the Yiddish expression Hakn a tshaynik [literally, to hit, strike or hack at a ...
forward.com/articles/13504/kettle-s-on-/
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Hak mir nisht keyn tshaynik | Yiddish Book Center
VOCABULARY. (דער טשײַניק(עס der tshaynik(es) – teapot. האַק מיר נישט קײן טשײַניק hak mir nisht keyn tshaynik stop bothering me, leave me alone. האַקן hakn ...
www.yiddishbookcenter.org/a-shmek-yidish/hak-mir-nisht-keyn-tshaynik
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hakn a tshaynik pronunciation: How to pronounce hakn a tshaynik in ...
Dec 4, 2008 ... Pronunciation guide: Learn how to pronounce Hakn a tshaynik in Yiddish with native pronunciation. Hakn a tshaynik translation and audio ...
www.forvo.com/word/hakn_a_tshaynik/
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3-MINUTES OF THERAPY DON'T “HAKN A TSHAYNIK”*
*In Yiddish, “Hakn a tshaynik” means “to be long winded, boring”. Over the years, Jews—and non-Jews—have been offered these “vertful” (valuable) services:.
www.marjoriegottliebwolfe.com/articles/details/3-MINUTES_OF_THERAPY_DONT_HAKN_A_TSHAYNIK/
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Hakn a tshaynik (Meaning of) - Encyclo
Look up: Hakn a tshaynik. Hakn a tshaynik. Hakn a tshaynik (literally "to knock a teakettle"), meaning to rattle on loudly and insistently, but without any meaning, ...
www.encyclo.co.uk/define/Hakn%20a%20tshaynik
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Hakn a Tshaynik | Moonfindings
Nov 19, 2013 ... Just to hold things over, here's a sound byte from one of my New Media projects.
schmulky.wordpress.com/2013/11/19/hakn-a-tshaynik/
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Alchemy and Ecstasy: Hak Mir Nisht Ken Tshaynik
May 11, 2010 ... Literally meaning "don't bang away at me like the lid on an empty kettle", the phrase "Hakn a tshaynik" was tossed around freely when I was ...
pamelagaard.blogspot.com/2010/05/hak-mir-nisht-ken-tshaynik.html
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Hak mir nisht keyn tshaynik - Jewish English Lexicon
Hakn a tshaynik = babble nonsense (lit. beat a teakettle) (Steinmetz's Yiddish dictionary). Edit See something you disagree with? Feel free to edit it. All changes ...
www.jewish-languages.org/jewish-english-lexicon/words/1525
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Hakn a tshaynik about the holidays | Michael Wex
Sep 14, 2009 ... Michael Wex explains how to complain about the never-ending pre-Jewish- holiday advertising.
michaelwex.com/2009/09/hakn-a-tshaynik-about-the-holidays/
Search results for "Hakn a tshaynik"
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Hakn a tshaynik in science
Hakn a tshaynik - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hakn a tshaynik (literally "to knock a teakettle"; Yiddish: האַקן אַ טשײַניק), meaning to rattle on loudly and insistently, but without any meaning, is a widely used ...
Hakn a Tshaynik | Moonfindings
Nov 19, 2013 ... Hakn a tshaynik ... By An Entomology Major at Cornell University ... Chainik, Hakn a tshaynik, Lockman, Moonfindings, New Media, Seth, ...
3-MINUTES OF THERAPY DON'T “HAKN A TSHAYNIK”*
*In Yiddish, “Hakn a tshaynik” means “to be long winded, boring”. Over the years ... One of the therapists, Jonathan Fast, is also a professor at Yeshiva University.
Kettle's On! – Forward.com
Jun 5, 2008 ... Forward reader Mark Hurvitz writes in an e-mail: “The question of the Yiddish expression Hakn a tshaynik [literally, to hit, strike or hack at a ...
Response to Judith Butler at Brooklyn College - The Sad Red Earth
Feb 18, 2013... a variation on the time-honored tendency to Hakn a tshaynik among the mishpucha. ... A university can stand in three relations to an idea.
Yiddish Vocabulary 7/7 Flashcards - Cram.com
Hakn a tshaynik (hak'∙n a tshay'∙nik). (v.) talk nonsense. אַרומרעדן arumredn (a· room'·red·n). (v.) talk over. אַדורכשמועסן adurkhshmuesn (∙). (v.) talk over. שמועס
'Born to Kvetch' a hilarious, insightful Yiddish lesson | j. the Jewish ...
If the Toronto university teacher and novelist ever makes a speaking appearance in ... On the origin of the phrase "Hakn a tshaynik": "[James Watt], an intelligent ...
Volume 14.035 | Mendele | מענדעלע
Wigoder, Published by Yad Vashem(Jerusalem) and “New York University Press” . ... However, I think 'Hakn a tshaynik' ... 7) Hakn a tshaynik (Sylvan Beer)
P.S. A Column On Things: "Shemot"--The Names We Use For Others
I'm not going to be long winded, boring ("Hakn a tshaynik"). ... by Nelson Mandela , the United Kingdom's oxford University, and scores of other organizations.
Monday, Sep 7, 2009 - Schmooze News
3-Minutes Of Therapy Don't "Hakn a tshaynik" · Visiting Rabbi Margolin ... Hillel receives honor to help strengthen university program · This Day ... In Jewish ...
Books on the term Hakn a tshaynik
Born to Kvetch: Yiddish Language and Culture in All of Its Moods
Born to Kvetch: Yiddish Language and Culture in All of Its Moods
Michael Wex, 2011
Hak mir nisht ken tshaynik—don't bang away at me like the lid on an empty kettle. The image is so striking that Hakn a tshaynik has become one of the most popular idioms in the language, making its way into millions of Jewish and non-Jewish ...
Born to Kvetch: Yiddish Language and Culture in All of Its Moods (P.S.)
Born to Kvetch: Yiddish Language and Culture in All of Its Moods (P.S.)
Michael Wex, 2006
Starred Review. Fortunately, despite its title and cover photo, this is not a kitschy book about a folksy language spoken by quaint, elderly Jews. It is, rather, an earthy romp through the lingua franca of Jews, which has roots reaching back to the Hebrew Bible and which continues to thrive in 21st-century America. Canadian professor, translator an...
Studies in Etymology and Etiology: With Emphasis on ...
Studies in Etymology and Etiology: With Emphasis on ...
David L. Gold, Antonio Lillo Buades, Félix Rodríguez González, 2009
Here are some examples of how English items of immediate Yiddish origin have entered non-Ashkenazic English to different degrees: 1. hak- a tshaynik (= the stem of the Eastern Yiddish idiom Hakn a tshaynik 'pour forth, run off at the mouth,  ...
Blessings, Curses, Hopes, and Fears: Psycho-ostensive ...
Blessings, Curses, Hopes, and Fears: Psycho-ostensive ...
James A. Matisoff, 2000
The idiom hakn + Dative Noun + a tshaynik (lit. "to bang on a teakettle to Dative Noun"), meaning "to yack away endlessly and remorselessly at somebody about matters of no interest," is familiar to most American Jews, no matter how little ...
Feed Me Bubbe: Recipes and Wisdom from America's Favorite ...
Feed Me Bubbe: Recipes and Wisdom from America's Favorite ...
Bubbe, Avrom Honig, 2011
... pot and place it on a cutting board. Cut it crosswise into slices. yiddish wordofthe day. y. Hakn a tshaynik = to talk too much, literally to chop a teakettle Beef Tongue with Sweet and Sour Sauce andRaisins These days. 148 • Feed Me Bubbe.
Jewish Language Review
Jewish Language Review
1985
The Eastern Yiddish idiom Hakn a tshaynik 'to talk nonsense' (so glossed in the MEYYED) has entered Eastern Ashkenazic English untranslated (hak a tshaynik, as Tn ''Stop haking me a tshaynik all the time!"), whereas in Eastern Ashkenazic ...
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Blog posts on the term
Hakn a tshaynik
Hakn a Tshaynik “Journalism” | CHLEAKS
Regarding: [PDF] Shneur Chaviv- Informers Have No Hope Introduction: Every once in a while I do a Google search patrol. I search various names and organizations of special interest for updates. So when news came that Israeli courts ruled that Yitzchak Shuchat was to be extradited to the U.S. for alleged crimes committed, I did…
whoisshmira.wordpress.com/2013/02/13/hakn-a-tshaynik-journalism-2/
Response to Judith Butler at Brooklyn College
. This commentary first appeared in the Algemeiner on February 15. The ironic and the disingenuous are kin. Their commonality resides in a gap, which is the distance between what is said and something else. With the ironic, the distance is between
sadredearth.com/response-to-judith-butler-at-brooklyn-college/
Craftmonkeys: fire island warm up
I'm thinking of hanging out a shingle this summer and trying to hock my teeny weeny wares.
craftmonkeys.typepad.com/craftmonkeys/2006/06/fire_island_war.html
Open Thread: “May You Grow Like An Onion, With Your Head in the Ground — And Then May THe Ground Be Fracked!” » Balloon Juice
www.balloon-juice.com/2012/08/24/open-thread-may-you-grow-like-an-onion-with-your-head-in-the-ground-and-then-may-the-ground-be-fracke/
Those Who Seek Offence Will Find It » Ciaran Laval
sl.governormarley.com/?p=2645
.:: THE SURFING BEATNIK - Thought-Dreams by Abraham Ahmed ::.: Once Only a Mail Courier...
"Her! . .
thesurfingbeatnik.blogspot.com/2012/04/once-only-mail-courier.html
Allah's Willing Executioners: Response to Judith Butler at Brooklyn College
The ironic and the disingenuous are kin. Their commonality resides in a gap, which is the distance between what is said and something else.
searchlight-germany.blogspot.com/2013/02/response-to-judith-butler-at-brooklyn.html
Pot Calls Kettle “Hitler” - Tablet Magazine
www.tabletmag.com/scroll/133222/pot-calls-kettle-hitler
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