Wankel rex
Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the most iconic dinosaurs, is known from numerous specimens, some of which have acquired a degree of notability in their own right because of their scientific importance and coverage by the media. See Tyrannosaurus for more information on the genus itself.

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The article Wankel rex at en.wikipedia.org was accessed 20 times in the last 30 days. (as of: 09/09/2013)
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Specimens of Tyrannosaurus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
3 1940s–1990s; 4 "Black Beauty": RTMP 81.6.1; 5 "Wankel rex or Devil Rex": MOR 555; 6 "Sue": FMNH PR2081; 7 "Stan": BHI 3033; 8 Peck's Rex; 9 Bucky ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specimens_of_Tyrannosaurus
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The Nation's T. Rex Invades the Smithsonian
15.04.2014 · Under cloudy skies and the threat of rain, conservators at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History unloaded the Nation's Tyrannosaurus rex ...
news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/04/140415-tyrannosaurus-rex-arrival-wankel-smithsonian-paleontology-science/
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My T. Rex Is Bigger Than Yours - National Geographic News
Oct 16, 2013 ... A close-up of the skull of the Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton known as the Wankel T.rex which was installed in front of the Museum of the Rockies ...
news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/10/131016-tyrannosaurus-rex-smithsonian-wankel-fossil-day/
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Photos: The Near-Complete Wankel T. Rex | LiveScience
A cast of the Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton known as the Wankel T. rex was installed in front of the Museum of the Rockies at Montana State University in …Read More » ...
www.livescience.com/37814-photos-wankel-t-rex-montana.html
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T. Rex - The Smithsonian Associates
Her discovery turned out to be the arm bones of a T. rex, remains so rare that Jack ... Join Wankel and Horner as they discuss this important discovery with ...
smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/tickets/reserve.aspx?performanceNumber=226947
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After 103 Years, the Natural History Museum Finally Gets Its Own ...
Jun 26, 2013 ... The “Wankel rex,” discovered in Montana in 1988, is one of just a dozen complete skeletons worldwide.
www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/after-103-years-the-natural-history-museum-finally-gets-its-own-tyrannosaurus-rex-3242757/
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MSU News - Wankel T. rex heads to Washington, D.C.
Apr 11, 2014 ... The Wankel T. rex is now on the road to Washington, D.C., where it's expected to attract more visitors than any other Tyrannosaurus rex fossil in ...
www.montana.edu/news/12570/wankel-t-rex-heads-to-washington-d-c
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A New View of T. Rex | Q?rius
Head of the Wankel T. rex fossil skeleton assembled in front of the Museum of the Rockies in Montana. The Wankel T. rex, on loan from the U.S. Army Corps of ...
qrius.si.edu/jump/new-view-t-rex
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America's T. Rex Gets A Makeover : NPR
Nov 6, 2014 ... Discovered in Montana in 1988, the Wankel T. Rex is a prize find — a nearly complete skeleton, now bound for display at the Smithsonian, ...
www.npr.org/2014/11/06/361736809/americas-t-rex-gets-a-makeover
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Smithsonian ScienceSmithsonian Welcomes “Nation's T. rex” to ...
Apr 16, 2014 ... Tyrannosaurus rex Osborn (Cast) Known as the “Wankel T. rex,” the rare fossil was found in 1988 by Kathy Wankel, a rancher from Angela, ...
smithsonianscience.org/2014/04/smithsonian-welcomes-nations-t-rex-washington-d-c/
Search results for "Wankel rex"
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Wankel rex in science
Specimens of Tyrannosaurus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
3 1940s–1990s; 4 "Black Beauty": RTMP 81.6.1; 5 "Wankel rex or Devil Rex": .... some of which are maintained in the collections of the University of California ...
Wankel-rex - Wikipedia
Meestal wordt ernaar verwezen als "de Wankel-rex". .... het Houston Museum of Nature and Science, het University of California Museum of Paleontology en het ...
Valley of the T-Rex - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It has been pointed out by Garner, however, that the shinbone of "Wankelrex" was put ... Tyrannosaurus rex, the Tyrant King (Indiana University Press, 2008), p.
File:Wankel Tyrannosaurus cast rib cage UCMP.JPG - Wikipedia ...
Description, The rib cage of a cast of the "Wankel T. rex", a 90% complete ... The cast of the skeleton is in the collection of the University of California Museum of ...
Wankel T-rex, Museum of the Rockies, Bozeman, MT - GigaPan
Feb 18, 2008 ... Wankel T-rex, Museum of the Rockies, Bozeman, MT by Bob Holmberg ... are registered trademarks of Carnegie Mellon University licensed by ...
Museum of the Rockies - Minnesota Jones
Located on the campus of Montana State University, this is the museum that Jack ... Specimen MOR 555, otherwise known as "Big Mike" or the Wankel rex (after ...
Tyrannosaurus - Wikimedia Commons
Apr 5, 2013 ... MOR 555 ("Wankelrex") and a Hadrosaur. MOR 555 cast ... "Wankel rex" at Palais de la decouverte, Paris. ... University of California, Berkeley.
WANKEL T. REX
Aug 27, 2002 ... To: dinosaur@usc.edu; Subject: WANKEL T. REX; From: ... Naish School of Earth & Environmental Sciences University of Portsmouth UK, PO1 ...
Wankel T. rex | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
Jan 14, 2007 ... A cast of the so called Wankel T. rex, named after the person who found it. ... Back then, it was the most complete T. rex ever found and the first to be found with ... University of California · Museum of Paleontology · Berkeley ...
Montana Museum Finally Wins Big Prize : Dinosaurs: After years of ...
Aug 4, 1990 ... Kathy and Tom Wankel are the Montana ranching couple who ... The first complete bone Kathy Wankel ever found turned out to be the first complete T-Rex ... the Rockies at Montana State University and found out what it was, ...
Books on the term Wankel rex
Tyrannosaurus Rex, the Tyrant King
Peter L. Larson, Kenneth Carpenter, 2008
Comments: This Tyrannosaurus rex extended the known range in the northern Great Plains south 1300 km nearly to the Mexican border. The specimen ... MOR 555 (Wankel rex; Devil rex) Discovered: The year 1988, Cathy Wankel, novice.
The Mesozoic Era: Age of Dinosaurs
Britannica Educational Publishing, Rafferty, John P, 2010
Wounds in the bones of its prey indicate that T. rex ate by using a “puncture and tear” stroke, planting its feet and using ... One, the 85—percent—complete “Wankel” T. rex, is on display at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Mont., and the ...
It Just Doesn't Look Right!!!
Derick Mack Virgil, PhD
Source Notes "When Tyrannosaurus rex was first discovered, the humerus was the only element of the forelimb known (1). ... the first complete Tyrannosaurus rex forelimbs were identified in 1989, belonging to MOR 555 (the "Wankel rex")(4 ).
Dinosaurs by the Decades: A Chronology of the Dinosaur in ...
Randy Moore, 2014
They argued that most of Earth's vegetation burned in the days and months after the K-T impact event. 1988 While fishing with her family in Montana's Fort Peck Reservoir, Kathy Wankel finds the first shoulder and arm of T. rex ever discovered .
The Complete T. Rex
John R. Horner, 1993
John R. Horner. saurs for BYU, and nobody's quite sure if there isn't a bigger one still in those jackets. But who knows when we'll find out, since BYU had to let its last paid preparator go this year. Kathy Wankel's T rex was bound to get worked ...
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Blog posts on the term
Wankel rex
‘The Nation’s T. rex’ is en route to Washington’s most-visited museum - The Washington Post
Fossil from Montana scheduled to arrive at the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum on Tuesday.
www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/local/wp/2014/04/14/the-nations-t-rex-is-en-route-to-washingtons-most-visited-museum/
Specimens of Tyrannosaurus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specimens_of_Tyrannosaurus
The Nation's T. Rex Is Coming…Look Out! - The Smithsonian Associates
smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/tickets/reserve.aspx?performanceNumber=226947
A New View of T. Rex | Q?rius
A Rare Find in MontanaIn 1988, amateur fossil hunter Kathy Wankel made an unusual and extremely valuable find while on a family camping trip in Montana. A bone sticking out of the ground turned out to be part of the fossilized skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus rex. The entire skeleton, now known as the Wankel T. rex, was excavated and displayed at the Museum of the Rockies. In 2013 it was prepared for its journey to Washington, D.C., where it will be on loan to the National Museum of Natural History for the next 50 years. It is one of the most complete skeletons of T. rex ever discovered. Piecing Together the EvidenceUnlike the Wankel T. rex, most fossil remains of tyrannosaurids and other dinosaurs are fragmentary. For example, analyzing dinosaur remains in Uzbekistan, Dr. Hans Dieter-Sues had to piece together the evidence. To date, most of the fossils from more than 60 digs are just tyrannosaurid teeth. Rarely, skull bones or bone fragments have been found. Still, Hans Dieter-Sues was able to fill gaps in the fossil record for tyrannosaurs from the late Cretaceous. Fossil preparators such as Michelle Pinsdorf work to clean, repair, and assemble the bones. The goal is to treat the bones in a way that protects them so that they remain useful for research in the long run. Michelle makes drawings and takes photos to record information about the bones. Preparing a fossil T. rex skeleton found in South Dakota, she was able to see that it was an adult due to the fusion of certain skull bones and the texture on the nose bones. In the Rex Room at the National Museum of Natural History, you will be able to watch museum staff study and prepare the Wankel T. rex and other fossils for display. Striking the Right PoseTyrannosaurus rex was one species in a family of predatory dinosaurs (Tyrannosauridae) that lived during the Cretaceous Period (66–68 million years ago) and walked on two legs. T. rex was the largest tyrannosaurid dinosaur. Like other tyrannosaurs, they had wide heads and long, thick tails. Old drawings of T. rex showed it standing upright. Further analysis of the body form and weight balance led paleontologists to conclude that its body was parallel to the ground. The chunky tails served to counterbalance its large head. A team of paleontologists including Dr. Matthew Carrano are collaborating to decide on an interesting and realistic body position for the Wankel T. rex. The positioning of T. rex and other dinosaur mounts in museums are reevaluated every so often based on new findings. Steve Jabo, a preparator of vertebrate fossils, and others at the National Museum of Natural History have reassembled Triceratops and Stegosaurus skeletons into more realistic poses, using evolving knowledge about how their bones and muscles fit together. Modern, digital ways of capturing information about objects help museums collect and maintain information about fossil bones. Smithsonian experts in laser scanning technology captured information about the Dinosaur Hall at the museum in preparation for renovation. Laser scanning can also be used to prepare specimens, such as the Wankel T. rex, for display by providing a database that can be used to see how different poses would look. Should the T. rex be walking? Tearing apart prey? Reading the Natural History in the BonesAny pose will reveal the short forearms of T. rex. The Wankel skeleton was the first skeleton complete enough to show how truly short its arms were. While short, they were strong, evidenced by large muscle attachment areas on the bones. How could a T. rex have used its short, strong arms? Paleontologists have speculated that they might have been used to clasp a mate or push up their large bodies up from a lying-down position, but much more study is needed. T. rex is often shown running after its prey, its large, banana-shaped teeth bared. In fact, T. rex may not have been able to run quickly. But neither could its prey, which were built for even slower speeds, so this probably wasn’t a problem. That is not to say that a T. rex was not fast. Paleontologists estimate its maximum walking speed as high as 25 miles per hour (40 km/hr), thanks to its huge stride. The first probable fossil of a T. rex was discovered by paleontologist Edward Drinker Cope in 1892 and named Manospondylus gigas. It was very fragmentary—just a single bone—so it took many years to recognize it as belonging to a T. rex. But the original Tyrannosaurus rex was discovered by Barnum Brown in eastern Montana, and it was given its famous name in 1905 by Henry Fairfield Osborn. The Largest Biped on the PlanetBecause of its impressive size—the largest biped ever known—T. rex has been a subject of study to determine how it stood and walked. Many scientists have attempted to understand its musculature and function. Recent work by Matthew Carrano showed that T. rex had leg muscles that were intermediate between those of crocodilians and birds in many ways, and that its stride was probably closer to that of a mammal (lots of hip joint motion) than a bird (lots of knee joint motion). At least one relative of T. rex was even feathered. Fossils of the early tyrannosaur Dilong paradoxus had feather-like structures on its body. These may have been lost in larger tyrannosaurids or restricted to small patches of skin. The mass extinction event at the end of the Cretaceous (66 million years ago) claimed T. rex among its victims, leaving paleontologists to learn about it through the fossil record and comparison to modern organisms. The Wankel T. rex will go on display in the new National Fossil Hall at the National Museum of Natural History in 2019!
qrius.si.edu/jump/new-view-t-rex
The Smithsonian Associates Presents “The Wankel T. rex Is Coming!” | Newsdesk
newsdesk.si.edu/releases/smithsonian-associates-presents-wankel-t-rex-coming
Wankel T-Rex « The Affiliate
blog-affiliations.org/?tag=wankel-t-rex
Gallery: Farewell to the Wankel T. rex - Bozeman Daily Chronicle: Gallery
Images from the send-off for the Wankel T. rex on April 11, 2014. The fossil will spend 50 years at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.
www.bozemandailychronicle.com/gallery/collection_3b1c701c-c3e6-11e3-b7f2-0019bb2963f4.html
BBC News - How to move a T-Rex dinosaur across the US
One of the most complete tyrannosaurus skeletons ever found is being moved from Montana to Washington DC. There, hundreds of millions of people will eventually be able to view it.
www.bbc.com/news/magazine-26981943
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