Welsh Indians
Madoc or Madog ab Owain Gwynedd was, according to folklore, a Welsh prince who sailed to America in 1170, over three hundred years before Christopher Columbus's voyage in 1492. According to the story, he was a son of Owain Gwynedd, and took to the sea to flee internecine violence at home. The "Madoc story" legend evidently evolved out of a medieval tradition about a Welsh hero's sea voyage, to which only allusions survive. However, it attained its greatest prominence during the Elizabethan era, when English and Welsh writers wrote of the claim that Madoc had come to the Americas as an assertion of prior discovery, and hence legal possession, of North America by the Kingdom of England.
The "Madoc story" remained popular in later centuries, and a later development asserted that Madoc's voyagers had intermarried with local Native Americans, and that their Welsh-speaking descendants still live somewhere in America. These "Welsh Indians" were credited with the construction of a number of natural and man-made landmarks throughout the American Midwest, and a number of white travellers were inspired to go and look for them. The "Madoc story" has been the subject of much speculation in the context of possible pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact. No historical or archaeological proof of such a man or his voyages has been found in the New or Old World; however speculation abounds connecting him with certain sites, such as Devil's Backbone, located on the Ohio River at Fourteen Mile Creek near Louisville, Kentucky.

This is an excerpt from the article Welsh Indians from the Wikipedia free encyclopedia. A list of authors is available at Wikipedia.
The article Welsh Indians at en.wikipedia.org was accessed 81 times in the last 30 days. (as of: 06/09/2013)
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Madoc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Welsh Indians were not claimed until over a century later. Morgan Jones' tract is the first account, and was printed by The Gentleman's Magazine, launching ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madoc
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Welsh “Indians”? - Bad Archaeology
4 Sep 2011 ... Around 1780, the search for “Welsh Indians” became fixed on the Mandan people of North Dakota. They were notably fair skinned by ...
www.badarchaeology.com/controversies/a-medieval-welsh-colony-in-north-america/welsh-indians/
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Will DNA turn Madoc myth into reality? | Toronto Star
22 Jul 2007 ... Lonewolf, 67, from the Pittsburgh area, believes he is descended from a tribe of Welsh Indians and is working on persuading U.S. authorities to ...
www.thestar.com/news/insight/2007/07/22/will_dna_turn_madoc_myth_into_reality.html
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The legend of Madoc ab Owain Gwynedd: Welsh Indians at the Falls ...
28 May 2013 ... One of the more popular legends of colonial America was that of Prince Madoc of Wales. Madoc sailed west from Wales in 1170, perhaps ...
filsonhistorical.org/the-legend-of-madoc-ab-owain-gwynedd-welsh-indians-at-the-falls-of-the-ohio/
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Setting the Record Straight: Blue-Eyed Indians and Welsh Mandans
Page discussing and correcting Internet myths about the effects of Viking and Celtic explorers on Native American tribes.
www.native-languages.org/iaq10.htm
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BBC Blogs - Wales - Prince Madoc and the Discovery of America
11 Oct 2010 ... Mandan Indians used Bull Boats for transport and fishing that are identical to the Welsh coracle. The man in question was Prince Madoc, the ...
www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/wales/posts/prince_madoc_discovery_of_america
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The Welsh Indians | Frances Hunter's American Heroes Blog
11 Jan 2011 ... The exact origins of American Indians have always been somewhat controversial . Most of us grew up with the theory that the ancestors of ...
franceshunter.wordpress.com/2011/01/11/the-welsh-indians/
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Purported Ancient Worlds/Welch Indians - Wikibooks, open books ...
Madoc (Madog or Madawg) ap Owain Gwynedd was a Welsh prince who, according to legend, discovered America in 1170, over three hundred years before ...
en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Purported_Ancient_Worlds/Welch_Indians
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The discovery of America ...by a Welsh Prince? - Historic UK
According to Welsh legend, that man was Prince Madog ab Owain Gwynedd. ... of Mobile Bay in 1170 and left behind, with the Indians, the Welsh language." ...
www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofWales/The-discovery-of-America-by-Welsh-Prince/
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Amazon.com: Footprints of the Welsh Indians: Settlers in North ...
Amazon.com: Footprints of the Welsh Indians: Settlers in North America Before 1492 (9780875863009): William L. Traxel: Books.
www.amazon.com/Footprints-Welsh-Indians-Settlers-America/dp/0875863000
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Welsh Indians in science
Madoc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
These "Welsh Indians" were credited with the construction of a number of natural ..... The Prince Madog, a research vessel owned by the University of Wales and ...
John Evans (explorer) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
John Thomas Evans (April 1770 - May 1799) was a Welsh explorer who ... in North America of the existence of a tribe of Welsh Indians, identified with the ... 26 :2 (Spring 2006) Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska–Lincoln  ...
3 - The Allure of the Same: Robert Southey's Welsh Indians and the ...
3 - The Allure of the Same: Robert Southey's Welsh Indians and the Rhetoric of Good Colonialism - University Publishing Online ...
The legend of Madoc ab Owain Gwynedd: Welsh Indians at the Falls ...
May 28, 2013 ... Campus Expansion Completion. 185Days. 01Hour ... The legend of Madoc ab Owain Gwynedd: Welsh Indians at the Falls of the Ohio. By Jana ...
Dissertations and theses - University of Wales
The University of Wales does not currently provide access to theses and dissertations ... repository for electronic doctoral theses submitted to Indian universities.
UK: We feel duped by TASMAC, say Indian students - University ...
Oct 23, 2011 ... Indians mortgage their homes to study in Britain. ... Two people from the University of Wales [which validated TASMAC degrees] were also ...
India Week: Why Wales is a hidden treasure with everything Indians ...
Oct 18, 2014 ... As Indians across the world prepare to celebrate the Hindu festival Diwali, ... The same applies with the universities in Wales, there is a lot of ...
Welsh Indians - Search Results - University Press Scholarship
Native Patriarchs—Pantisocracy and the Americanization of Wales. Tim Fulford. in Romantic Indians: Native Americans, British Literature, and Transatlantic ...
The Wish for a White West: Welsh Indians and the Early Republic
Nov 28, 2012 ... The Wish for a White West: Welsh Indians and the Early Republic ... Series: Edward Watts, Department of English, Michigan State University.
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Welsh Indians
The Welsh Indians | Frances Hunter's American Heroes Blog
The exact origins of American Indians have always been somewhat controversial. Most of us grew up with the theory that the ancestors of Native Americans migrated across the Bering Strait about 12,000 years ago. Recent archeological evidence, however, indicates that people may have lived in the Americas much longer. Most Native American tribes have origin…
franceshunter.wordpress.com/2011/01/11/the-welsh-indians/
The legend of Madoc ab Owain Gwynedd: Welsh Indians at the Falls of the Ohio | The Filson Historical Society
filsonhistorical.org/the-legend-of-madoc-ab-owain-gwynedd-welsh-indians-at-the-falls-of-the-ohio/
BBC Blogs - Wales - Prince Madoc and the Discovery of America
Who discovered America? It's a simple question and one that usually brings the standard response - Christopher Columbus. But here in Wales we have our own theory. And that theory says that America was actually discovered 300 years before Columbus sailed "the ocean blue" in 1492 - and more importantly, that it was discovered by a Welshman. Mandan Indians used Bull Boats for transport and fishing that are identical to the Welsh coracle. The man in question was Prince Madoc, the son of Owain Gwynedd, one of the greatest and most important rulers in the country, and while the legend cannot be corroborated there are many who believe it implicitly. Owain Gwynedd certainly existed, his reign being marred by long and hard-fought disputes with Henry II, king of England. The story goes that in 1170 Owain died and, almost immediately, a violent and very bloody dispute arose between his 13 children regarding the succession. Madoc and his brother Rhirid were so upset and angered by events that they decided they wanted no further part in what was happening. Indeed, they wanted nothing more to do with their family or their homeland. They duly took ship from Rhos on Sea (Llandrillo) and sailed westwards to see what they could find. What Prince Madoc found, so the legend runs, was America. He and his brother managed to cross the Atlantic and land on the shores of the New World. Madoc returned to Gwynedd for more men, then sailed off again, this time never to return. His sailors inter-married with a local Native American tribe and for years the rumour of Welsh speaking Native American tribes was widely believed. It is, of course, the stuff of legend but like all good legends it has at least a grain of truth about it. As America was explored and colonised several Native American tribes were discovered, speaking a language that did actually sound quite like Welsh. That was not the only connection. The Mandan Indians used Bull Boats for transport and fishing, vessels that were identical to the famous Welsh coracles. It was all too good for storytellers and poets to ignore. The legend lasted well into the 19th century and even the explorers Lewis and Clark were instructed to keep their eyes open for these "Welsh speaking Indians" while they were trekking through the interior of the country. The earliest reference to such a people can be found in a Welsh poem by Maredudd ap Rhys who lived and wrote in the years between 1450 and 1483. However, it was during the Elizabethan period that the story gathered momentum and grew. There was a political agenda behind the spreading of the legend - it was a ploy, used to assert the right of England to the lands of the New World. Put quite simply, Welsh colonisation of America, many years before, was a convenient justification for Elizabethan settlement in a territory that had already been claimed by Spain. Starting with Humphrey Llwyd in 1559, the story was embroidered and developed - the detail of the Welsh speaking tribe comes from this period. Even recognised experts in the field of navigation and exploration, men such as Richard Hakluyt, consciously and deliberately wrote about the legend as if it were the absolute truth. Sadly, there is no absolute historical or archaeological proof - even Lewis and Clark were unable to find that - but it remains a great story, one that we in Wales have taken to our hearts. Other people have not been quite as happy to believe the story of Prince Madoc. In 1953 the Daughters of the American Revolution set up a plaque on the shores of Mobile Bay in Alabama. On the plaque it stated that it had been erected "In memory of Prince Madoc," who was in the opinion of the Daughters of the Revolution the original discoverer of America. The plaque did not last long and was soon removed by the Alabama Parks Department. For Welsh men and women, however, the story of Madoc's discovery of America remains special - even if, in our heart of hearts, we know that it is probably not true. And as the saying goes, why let the truth get in the way of a good story? Feel free to comment! If you want to have your say, on this or any other BBC blog, you will need to sign in to your BBC iD account. If you don't have a BBC iD account, you can register here - it'll allow you to contribute to a range of BBC sites and services using a single login. Need some assistance? Read about BBC iD, or get some help with registering.
www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/wales/posts/prince_madoc_discovery_of_america
Did Lewis and Clark Seek Welsh Indians? - Jason Colavito
www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/did-lewis-and-clark-seek-welsh-indians
Great British Nutters: John Evans: In Search of the Welsh Indians
“Either the Madogion or death”– John EvansSorry, I don't speak Welsh JOHN EVANS WAS A STRANGE YOUNG MAN who went on a bizarre journey to find a tribe of Welsh-speaking American Indians. It was a daring trip, and a foolish one.
greatbritishnutters.blogspot.com/2008/01/john-evans-in-search-of-welsh-indians.html
The History Scroll: Welsh Indians?
During the 17th and 18th century, it was believed that the Mandan Indians were part Welsh. They were considered “white Indians.” Thomas Jefferson had read about these Indians and wanted Lewis and Clark to find them. In a PBS Interview, historian Dayton Duncan said this about the legends of the western United States: “Well, it's odd.
thehistoryscroll.blogspot.com/2012/11/welsh-indians.html
Indian in Wales, Indian expats living in Wales
Meet Indian in Wales on the Indian expat in Wales network. The best way to contact Indian expatriates in Wales.
www.expat-blog.com/en/nationalities/indian/in/europe/wales/
Historical articles and illustrations » Blog Archive » Prince Madoc may have taken the Welsh language to America
This edited article about Madoc of Wales first appeared in Look and Learn issue number 594 published on 2 June 1973. Mobile, Alabama, where Madoc is said to have landed three centuries before Columbus Lieutenant Joseph Roberts felt intensely irritated. A thoughtless Welsh servant boy had put warm water in his brandy instead of cold.
www.lookandlearn.com/blog/31731/prince-madoc-may-have-taken-the-welsh-language-to-america/
Madoc - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madoc
Welsh Indians - RationalWiki
rationalwiki.org/wiki/Welsh_Indians
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