William Henry Vane, 3rd Earl of Darlington
William Harry Vane, 1st Duke of Cleveland KG (27 July 1766 – 29 January 1842), styled Viscount Barnard until 1792 and known as The Earl of Darlington between 1792 and 1827 and as The Marquess of Cleveland between 1827 and 1833, was a British landowner and politician.

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William Vane, 1st Duke of Cleveland - Wikipedia, the free ...
Henry, Earl of Darlington, later 2nd Duke of Cleveland (1788–1864). Lady Louisa Catherine ... Lord William Vane, later 3rd Duke of Cleveland (1792–1864).
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William Henry Vane (1766–1842), 3rd Earl of Darlington ... - BBC.com
View William Henry Vane (1766–1842), 3rd Earl of Darlington, Later 1st Duke of Cleveland by Arthur William Devis. Find out more and explore similar paintings ...
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- Person Page 2541
William Henry Vane, 1st Duke of Cleveland was born on 27 July 1766.1 He was ... on 8 September 1792.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Darlington, co.
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Owners and Breeders - William Henry Vane - Bloodlines.net
William Henry Vane (1766-1842), Lord Barnard, 3rd Earl of Darlington, Marquess of Cleveland, and Baron Raby and Duke of Cleveland. Born in St James's ...
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Darlington, Earl of (GB, 1754 - 1891) - Cracroft's Peerage
Nov 3, 2004 ... Henry [Vane], 3rd Baron Barnard later 1st Earl of Darlington, PC ... dau. of Sir William Pulteney), 1st illegit. son of King Charles II by his mistress ...
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William Harry Vane, Duke of Cleveland b. 27 Jul 1766 d. 29 Jan ...
William Harry Vane, Duke of Cleveland b. ... ASSIGNMENTS: Bearer of the 3rd sword at the Coronation of William IV, 1831. ... TITLES: Succeeded father, in 1792 as Earl of Darlington and Viscount ... Father, Henry Vane, Earl of Darlington , b.
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House of Vane/Fane - European Heraldry
Henry Vane, 1st Earl of Darlington, Viscount Barnard, 3rd Baron Barnard (c. ... William John Frederick Vane then Powlett, then again Vane, 3rd Duke of ...
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Whig Organization in the General Election of 1790: Selections from ... - Google Books Result
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Vane, Sir William Henry 1st Duke of Cleveland b. 27 Jul 1766 d. 29 ...
Vane, Sir William Henry 1st Duke of Cleveland b. ... Father, Vane, Henry 2nd Earl of Darlington, b. 1726 ... He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Darlington co.
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Descendants of Charles II of England - Wikipedia, the free ...
... Cleveland [edit]. See also: Duke of Southampton, Duke of Cleveland, and Earl of Darlington ... son of William Henry Vane, 1st Duke of Cleveland and Lady Catherine Powlett, Lady Sophia Poulett ... aged 75. William John Frederick Vane, 3rd Duke of Cleveland ..... Directory of Royal Genealogical Data: University of Hull.
- Person Page 2541
William Henry Vane, 1st Duke of Cleveland was born on 27 July 1766.1 He was the ... Vane at birth.1 He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford University, Oxford, ... on 8 September 1792.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Darlington, co.
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William John Frederick Vane, 3rd Duke of Cleveland was born on 3 April 1792.1 ... Durham [U.K., 1833] on 18 January 1864.1 He succeeded to the title of 5th Earl of Darlington, co. ... Child of Sir John Henry Newbolt and Elizabeth Juliana Digby .... younger son.1 He was educated at Christ Church, Oxford University, Oxford, ...
Vane, Sir William Henry 1st Duke of Cleveland b. 27 Jul 1766 d. 29 ...
Vane, Sir William Henry 1st Duke of Cleveland b. ... Father, Vane, Henry 2nd Earl of Darlington, b. 1726 ... He matriculated at Christ Church College Oxford University Oxford Oxfordshire ... He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Darlington co.
POWLETT (formerly VANE), Hon. William John Frederick (1792 ...
Available from Cambridge University Press ... 3 Apr. 1792, 2nd s. of William Harry Vane†, 3rd earl of Darlington (d. 1842), and 1st ... Lady Catherine Margaret Powlett, da. and coh. of Harry Powlett†, 6th duke of Bolton; bro. of Henry Vane, Visct.
Earl of Vane - Polsearch
William Henry Vane, 3rd Earl of Darlington, 1st Duke of Cleveland (1766-1842) ... Library, University of London: VANE, Henry, 1st Earl of Darlington (1705-1758) ...
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Jan 12, 2006 ... Sir William Henry Vane, 1st Duke of Cleveland was born on 27 July 1766.1 He ... of William Harry.1 He matriculated in Christ Church, Oxford University, Oxford, ... 1792.1 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Earl of Darlington, co.
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Hill was a quack or charlatan with a diploma of medicine from the University of St. ... William Henry Pyne (1769-1843) was an English writer, painter and .... Duke of Bolton; married 1787 to William Henry Vane, 3rd Earl of Darlington and Duke ...
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Results 1 - 16 of 16... daughter of the sixth and last Duke of Bolton; married 1787 to William Henry Vane, 3rd Earl of Darlington and Duke of Cleveland.
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Poole was disinterested in match racing, but allowed his friend, the Duke of Grafton, .... He was then sold to William Henry Vane, (3rd) Earl of Darlington, a northern ..... a university friend of Grafton's who later managed the Grafton stables .
Books on the term William Henry Vane, 3rd Earl of Darlington
History of Battle abbey [by C.L.W. Powlett].
History of Battle abbey [by C.L.W. Powlett].
Catherine Lucy W. Powlett (duchess of Cleveland.), 1877
Vane and Lowther. Henry Vane, second Earl of Darlington, son and heir, married Margaret, daughter of Robert Lowther, and sister and co-heir of James, first Earl of Lonsdale. 23. Vane and Powlett. William Henry Vane, third Earl of Darlington, ...
The Growth of Economic Thought, 3rd ed.
The Growth of Economic Thought, 3rd ed.
Henry William Spiegel and Ann Hubbard, 1991
In a new and updated edition of this classic textbook, Henry William Spiegel brings his discussion and analysis of economic thought into the 1990s. A new introductory chapter offering an overall view of the history of economics and a bibliographic survey of the economic literature of the 1980s and early 1990s have been added. Maintaining the link b...
The Spectator
The Spectator
1864
He was Master of the Jewel Office, Governor of Carlisle, Lord- Lieutenant of Durham, &c, and a Colonel in the army, and died September 8, 1792, being succeeded by bis only son, William Henry Vane, third Earl of Darlington, who married ...
Sir Thomas More: Third Series (Arden Shakespeare)
Sir Thomas More: Third Series (Arden Shakespeare)
William Shakespeare, Anthony Munday, Henry Chettle and John Jowett, 2011
This edition of Sir Thomas More is the first to bring the play into the context of a major Shakespeare series, to provide a substantial critical analysis, and to offer a comprehensive modern stage history. The introduction deals with issues such as the strange involvement of the anti-Catholic spy-hunter Anthony Munday as chief dramatist, the place ...
The Local Historian's Table Book: Historical division
The Local Historian's Table Book: Historical division
1846
The health of the venerable duke had been, for some years past in a very precarious state, and during the last ... The third lord Barnard, having filled some high official employments, was created viscount Barnard and earl of Darlington by letters patent dated the 3rd of April, 1754. The deceased, William Henry Vane, duke and marquess of Cleveland, earl of Darlington, viscount and baron Barnard of ...
The life of Sir Henry Vane the younger, with a history of the events of his time
The life of Sir Henry Vane the younger, with a history of the events of his time
William Wotherspoon, 1832-1909, . Ireland, 2012
This book was originally published prior to 1923, and represents a reproduction of an important historical work, maintaining the same format as the original work. While some publishers have opted to apply OCR (optical character recognition) technology to the process, we believe this leads to sub-optimal results (frequent typographical errors, stran...
The Borderer's table book: or, Gatherings of the local history and ...
The Borderer's table book: or, Gatherings of the local history and ...
Moses Aaron Richardson, 1846
The health of the venerable duke had been, for some years past in a very precarious state, and during the last ... The third lord Barnard, having filled some high official employments, was created viscount Barnard and earl of Darlington by letters patent dated the 3rd of April, 1754. The deceased, William Henry Vane, duke and marquess of Cleveland, earl of Darlington, viscount and baron Barnard of ...
Vane's Story: Weddah and Om-El-Bonain, and Other Poems
Vane's Story: Weddah and Om-El-Bonain, and Other Poems
Edward Hayes Plumptre, John Stuart Blackie, Henry Nutcombe Oxenham and James Thomson, 2012
This book was originally published prior to 1923, and represents a reproduction of an important historical work, maintaining the same format as the original work. While some publishers have opted to apply OCR (optical character recognition) technology to the process, we believe this leads to sub-optimal results (frequent typographical errors, stran...
Reference handbook for readers, students, and teachers of English ...
Reference handbook for readers, students, and teachers of English ...
E. Henry Gurney, 1890
Third Lord Barnard; created Earl of Darlington, 1754. Married Grace, daughter of Charles Fitzroy, Duke of Cleveland, son of Charles II. Died 1756. Henry Vane, Second Earl of Darlington. Son. Died 1792. William Henry Vane, Third Earl. Son.
The life of Sir Henry Vane the younger: with a history of the events of his time
The life of Sir Henry Vane the younger: with a history of the events of his time
William W. Ireland, 1905
This book was digitized and reprinted from the collections of the University of California Libraries. Together, the more than one hundred UC Libraries comprise the largest university research library in the world, with over thirty-five million volumes in their holdings. This book and hundreds of thousands of others can be found online in the HathiT...
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William Henry Vane, 3rd Earl of Darlington
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William Vane, 1st Duke of Cleveland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia William Vane, 1st Duke of ClevelandFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation,searchThis article does not cite any references or ...
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Famous Deaths on 6th March | HistoryOrb.com
Famous deaths for the 6th of March. See which celebrities, historical figures, scientists and criminals died throughout history on 6 March.
www.historyorb.com/deaths/march/6
onelondonone: Thomas Creevey on Lady Darlington
From The Creevey Papers Raby Castle [Earl of Darlington's], Feb. 16th, 1825.
onelondonone.blogspot.com/2011/05/thomas-creevey-on-lady-darlington.html
Sydney Buildings History: How the road evolved
The origins of the road are intimately linked to the development of the Kennet & Avon Canal, which reached the old road to Claverton (now called Bathwick Hill) in 1800 and opened through to the Avon in November 1810. Meanwhile, in 1808, William Henry Vane, 3rd Earl of Darlington (and later Duke of Cleveland), inherited the Pulteney estates and set about extending residential development of the Bathwick area.
sydneybuildingshistory.blogspot.com/2007/10/sb-is-listed-as-street-name-in-bd1819.html
This Day in History for 6th March | HistoryOrb.com
This day in history for the 6th of March. See what historical events occurred, which famous people were born and who died on 6 Mar.
www.historyorb.com/day/march/6
DubStewartMania: The Lysaght Family of Mountnorth, Cork
Catherine Deane of Crumlin married John Lysaght, 1st Baron Lisle of Mountnorth, Co. Cork.
alison-stewart.blogspot.com/2012/04/lysaght-family-of-mountnorth-cork.html
What Happened On March 6 In History?
March 6 certain events happened on this day in history. Find out the 256 events that were made this day in history.
www.whathappenedtodayinhistory.org/?m=March&d=6&go=Go
Firebrand, Winchelsea, East Sussex | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
TQ 9017-9117 ICKLESHAM HIGH STREET, WINCHELSEA (south side) 51/46 Firebrand 3.8.61 GV II Timber-framed building containing some C14 and C15 work but altered in the C18 and leter modernised. Two storeys and attic. The front facing High Street has 7 windows and is faced with cream-coloured weather-boarding. Gable at each end. Sash windows with glazing bars intact. Tiled roof. The side facing St Thomas's Street has one window. The ground floor is faced with stone rubble and above with tarred weather-boarding. Ceiling beams inside and king-post roof. Vaulted cellar of about 1300 beneath the house. www.imagesofengland.org.uk/Details/Default.aspx?id=410507... One of the few industries to prosper in Winchelsea after its decline was smuggling, much to the distress of John Wesley (1703-1791), who lamented of local people that "They will not part with the accursed thing”. Wesley paid his first visit to Winchelsea on 30 October 1771, arriving by foot from Rye to preach to "a considerable number of serious people". He returned on 28 January 1789, by which time, local Methodists had a preaching house. This was built in 1785 and originally called Evens' Chapel, supposedly after the neighbour who donated the plot. From the pulpit, Wesley preached to a room "well filled with decent serious hearers, who seemed to receive the truth in the love of it". The chapel has changed very little since it was opened. In 1867, a new chapel was opened (on the site of Chapel Plat in Hiham Green) and the old chapel was put up for sale. Fortunately, there were no buyers and the Methodists moved back to Wesleys Chapel in 1969 as their numbers declined. It was at Winchelsea that Wesley preached his last outdoor sermon, six months before his death, under an ash tree on German Street on Thursday, 7 October 1790, famously describing his visit to “that poor skeleton of ancient Winchelsea”. Wesley had to preach outdoors because of the size of the crowd and because, as elsewhere, the established church excluded him In Winchelsea, the Rector at the time of his visits, Drake Hollingberry, declared that, "If I saw the Devil running across the churchyard with a Methodist on his back, I would not intervene. He would merely be taking care of his own!" For his last sermon, Wesley had to sit down because of his age, although he wrote, "I stood under a large tree and called to most of the inhabitants of the town 'the kingdom of heaven is at hand: repent and believe in the Gospel'. It seemed as if all that heard were for the present, almost persuaded to be Christians"! Wesley’s tree, much weakened by souvenir hunters, blew down in 1927 but a new tree was grown from a sapling taken from a cutting from the original and planted in 1931. The Methodist congregation in Winchelsea declined after Wesley's death but was revived by the arrival of troops during the Napoleonic War and prospered until after the Second World War. Nowadays, Wesley's Chapel is not in permanent use, but the local Methodist Circuit preserves the building and holds regular events to keep it in use. Smuggling reached its peak around Winchelsea in the 1820’s. In 1829, it was recorded that 70 or 80 men passed through Winchelsea at four in the morning each carrying two casks. It is claimed that the last smuggler killed in England in a fight with the coastguards was one Thomas Monk, a “poor fiddler” of Winchelsea on 1 April 1838. With the formation of the Coastguard in 1831 and the reform of the Customs Service in 1853, smuggling virtually died out, although the last entry about smuggling in the Winchelsea's gaol book recorded that one Captain Parker of Winchelsea was fined for the offence in the 1880's. In the 18th century, there was an attempt to build a new harbour for Rye in what is now Winchelsea Beach, which is actually closer to Winchelsea than Rye. It was linked to Rye by the River Brede. The harbour was authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1722. It took 63 years to build but was closed within weeks of opening in 1787, blocked by the shifting shingle that had destroyed the port of New Winchelsea. Much of it was built using stone from the ruins of Winchelsea’s churches and possibly the town wall. It is known as Smeaton’s Harbour, after its architect, and now lies under the Harbour Field football pitches in Winchelsea Beach. www.winchelsea.net/visiting/winchelsea_history_pt16.htm Even though Winchelsea had declined to little more than a village by the end of the 16th century, it retained its two seats in parliament, except for a period during the Commonwealth when Cromwell reallocated them to the large but unrepresented midland towns. Daniel Defoe was outraged when he discovered that decayed Winchelsea returned two MPs, commenting that more was spent on elections than the worth of the entire parish. However, the parliamentary seats were of no benefit to Winchelsea and so there was little local interest in them. From about 1597, this allowed the Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports to secure the patronage of at least one of the seats, by controlling the election of Freemen, as only Freemen had a vote. Thus, Winchelsea became a rotten borough. In order to control the Freemen of Winchelsea, their number was kept to a minimum (in 1792, it was just three), so that any meeting of the Corporation to elect new Freemen could be made inquorate by just one or two of the existing Freemen absenting themselves. Another control on the parliamentary seats was that the mayor was also the Returning Officer for general elections. The abuse of the electoral system at times became so blatant, even by the standards of rotten boroughs, that two mayors --- Paul Wymond in 1623 and Edward Marten in 1700 --- were jailed. While Winchelsea was a rotten borough, very few Freemen were residents of the town and many others were only nominally resident, or took up residence only upon their election as Freemen. Habitual absentees included the mayor, who was usually non-resident: his day-to-day duties were performed by a deputy. The control of the Lord Warden over Winchelsea’s parliamentary seats was briefly defied by the Mayor and Corporation when the Duke of York, later James II, became Lord Warden. However, after the Glorious Revolution, the patronage of the seats of the rotten boroughs in the Cinque Port Confederation was secured by the government. Many famous names were MP for Winchelsea but few, if any, had anything to do with the place. One of them, William Wilberforce, once drove through Winchelsea unawares and, after learning where he was, exclaimed, “Why that’s the place I’m member for”. The government lost the patronage of Winchelsea’s parliamentary seats when one of their agents, Arnold Nesbitt, acquired sufficient property in the town to exert independent control of the Freemen. The government attempted to overturn Nesbitt’s election by challenging the election of some Freemen in a series of legal actions starting in 1766 and known as the Winchelsea Causes. In vying with others for the patronage of Winchelsea, Nesbitt sparked a brief recovery in Winchelsea’s fortunes. Candidates built new houses for tenants who were Freemen. The windmill was moved to the site of St Leonard’s Church. In 1763, Nesbitt helped to establish the English Linen Company, to regularise a business set up by Huguenot refugees a couple of years earlier to manufacture cambric (a fine linen originally made in Cambrai in France). The raw material was flax grown in the Brede Valley. The cellars of the town offered the constant temperature and humidity needed for working the delicate fibres. Several houses were repaired and new ones built to accommodate the workforce, as well as provide workshops, in Barrack Square and on the corner of North Street and School Hill (now called the Five Houses). At its peak, the company employed 160 spinners, winders and weavers, and 26 apprentices, to work 86 looms. Many of the skilled employees were Huguenots, while the apprentices were children from the local poorhouses. One of the two superintendents of the factory was a Huguenot named Mariteau. He built the house in Monks Walk that bears his name. The company failed in 1769 but was rescued by another Huguenot called Nouvaille. It remained in Winchelsea until 1810, when it was relocated to Norwich, by which time, it was also producing lawn and Italian crepe. One of the most important patrons of Winchelsea following Nesbitt was William Harry Vane, Earl of Darlington and late the Duke of Cleveland. His connection is commemorated in the names of Cleveland House, Cleveland Cottage and Cleveland Place in Back Lane and Friars Road. Curiously, the patronage of the Duke of Cleveland helped end the rotten boroughs as he was an enthusiastic supporter of the Whigs and instrumental in the Reform Act of 1832. www.winchelsea.net/visiting/winchelsea_history_pt17.htm The Napoleonic War brought more money into Winchelsea, notably from the building of the Royal Military Canal between 1804 and 1809 and, from 1805, the construction of the chain of Martello Towers. The Canal runs from Shorncliffe in Kent, following the ancient shoreline around the top of Romney Marsh, to join the River Rother at Iden. It incorporates the Rother as far as Rye and then the Brede as far as Winchelsea, after which, it runs along the eastern side of the town and on to the Cliff End. There is a spectacular engraving by JMW Turner (now at Hastings Museum) of an incident at the junction of the Canal and the Brede below Winchelsea, when a temporary dam protecting the construction of the junction was swept away by the spring tide. Eight Martello Towers were built between Rye and Pett Level, of which, only one remains: No.28 at Rye Harbour, the wonderfully named Enchantress. The war also brought a garrison of 500 infantry between 1794 and 1814. Together with soldiers’ families, the garrison would have doubled Winchelsea’s population. Many soldiers were billeted in the cambric factory in what consequently became known as Barrack Square: married men and their families on the ground and first floor; and unmarried men in a dormitory running the whole length of the top floor. Some officers bought, built or rented houses. Others were billeted in the Court Hall. Many of the present houses and street names in Winchelsea date from the period of the Napoleonic War garrison, including The Armoury, Barrack Square, Cooks Green, Magazine House and Tower Cottage. 72 soldiers who died from their wounds after being repatriated from the Peninsular War are buried in the churchyard. Winchelsea itself raised No.4 company of the 3rd battalion of the Cinque Port Volunteers, a militia regiment. While waiting for Bonaparte, the officers founded the Winchelsea Cricket Club in 1796. www.winchelsea.net/visiting/winchelsea_history_pt18.htm The loss of the cambric factory and the end of the Napoleonic War termonated Winchelsea’s modest revival. Insult was added to injury by the loss of its two MPs under the Reform Act of 1832. Then, in 1886, the Corporation lost its remaining civil and judicial powers, and Winchelsea was forced, against its will, into the Parish of Icklesham. It was not all doom and gloom however. The dereliction of the Church of St Thomas was halted and reversed by a skilful restoration programme in the first half of the 19th century. 1850 saw the publication of what, until recently, has been the seminal book on the history of the medieval town, by William Durrant Cooper. www.winchelsea.net/visiting/winchelsea_history_pt19.htm In the late 19th century, there was an influx of artists and writers to Winchelsea and Rye. The decayed grandeur of Winchelsea appealed to the romantic side of the Victorians, none more so that the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Moreover, their hero, Joseph Mallord William Turner, had sketched and painted extensively in the area, including a dramatic scene of soldiers marching along the road along the Royal Military Canal and up Strand Hill into Winchelsea (Winchelsea, Sussex, 1828). Two etchings of the Ferry Gate (which he called the East Gate) were included in his Liber Studiorum. Dante Gabriel Rosetti visited in 1866, commenting on the “pleasant doziness” of Winchelsea, and observing how a procession of the Mayor and Corporation was “observed by a mob of one female child in the street and by us from the inn window” (a scene still played out today). One of the most frequent Pre-Raphaelite visitors to Winchelsea was John Everett Millais, who sometimes stayed with William Holman Hunt at Pett, and other times at Glebe or the New Inn in Winchelsea. Both of them had been introduced to the area by Edward Lear. In Winchelsea in 1854, Millais painted The Blind Girl and The Random Shot (also called L’Enfant du Regiment), the former set against the background of Strand Hill and the latter on one of the tombs in St Thomas’s Church. The Millais family later settled in Winchelsea. The Blind Girl by John Everett Millais (Birmingham Museums & Art Gallery) It may have been Millais who introduced William Makepeace Thackeray to Winchelsea. Thackeray’s novel Denis Duval was set in Winchelsea, and mixed real and fictional characters. The eponymous hero, who was the descendant of Huguenot refugees and modelled on Millais, is determined to follow his uncle into the Royal Navy, but his grandfather wishes Denis to join his band of smugglers. Among the real characters in the story were George and Joseph Weston. The Weston brothers were outwardly respectable citizens (George was a churchwarden) but they had a criminal past --- including fraud, obtaining money by threats (while one of them was Chief Constable of Manchester), highway robbery and smuggling. Eventually, George Weston was recognised by a sheriff and followed to church. When the two brothers emerged, bibles in hand, they were confronted. Although they managed to escape, they were pursued and arrested. The brothers were sentenced to death, but escaped from Newgate Gaol. However, they were recaptured, taken to Tyburn “kicking and struggling and biting their captors” and hanged on 3 September 1782. In Thackeray's novel, the Westons are portrayed as active highwaymen, and one of them is shot in the face by Denis Duval while attempting to rob a stagecoach on which Denis is travelling. Unfortunately, the novel was never finished. The writer Ford Madox Ford came to Winchelsea in 1891 to visit his sweetheart, Elsie Martindale, daughter of the local doctor (and original author of The Extra Pharmacopoeia, a list of new drugs still being published today and known colloquially by doctors as the “Martindale”). He eloped with her in 1894, but returned to live in Winchelsea in 1901 once relations with her family had been repaired. While in Winchelsea, Ford wrote A History of the Cinque Ports (1899), which included two chapters on Winchelsea. Ford was visited in Winchelsea by Joseph Conrad, who rented a cottage opposite Ford’s house (which was the Little House in Friars Road). During this period, Ford and Conrad jointly wrote The Inheritors (1901) and Romance (1903), and Conrad wrote Youth (1902) and Nostromo (1904), but Winchelsea’s role in their authorship is uncertain. Ford left Winchelsea in 1907 as his marriage was breaking up. A footnote: during his time in Winchelsea, Ford was known by his original name, Francis Hermann Hueffer. He changed it in 1921 --- adopting the name of his grandfather, the famous artist and supporter of the Pre-Raphaelites, Ford Madox Brown --- having refused to bow to anti-German sentiment during the First World War (in which he served as an officer in the British Army). Another artistic Victorian resident of Winchelsea was the actress Ellen Terry, who bought Tower Cottage in 1896. She was frequently visited in Winchelsea by the redoubtable Sir Henry Irving. Miss Terry gave the sexton of St Thomas’s Church a scare by rehearsing the part of Lady Macbeth in the church late at night. She left Winchelsea in 1906 to live in Smallhythe. Other notable artists and writers visited Winchelsea. Ralph Caldecott, famous for illustrating children’s books, stayed in the 1870’s. In the early 1900’s, Beatrix Potter, rented Haskards in St Thomas’s Street. Edward Elgar dragged EF Benson from a game of golf in Rye to search Winchelsea churchyard for an ancestor whom he believed had been hung for sheep stealing. Henry James used to walk and cycle from Rye over to Winchelsea and brought Stephen Crane (author of the Red Badge of Courage) and HG Wells (who wrote a short story in 1927 called Miss Winchelsea’s Heart). www.winchelsea.net/visiting/winchelsea_history_pt20.htm In 1940, Winchelsea once again found itself in the sights of a possible foreign invasion. It is sometimes claimed that Hitler’s abortive Operation Sealion planned a beachhead between Rye and New Romney. Winchelsea Beach became part of the Rye Defence Area and a prohibited zone for civilians. Pett Level was flooded. Families who had been evacuated from London were evacuated elsewhere, along with 85,000 sheep, who were shipped by train to Yorkshire! Winchelsea itself was garrisoned and two Bofors guns were emplaced either side of the Strand Gate. The Court Hall and Periteau House were used as billets, the Armoury as the Officers Mess, Glebe as the Sergeants’ Mess, Firebrand as Company HQ, Yew Tree House as the hospital and the Cricket Field as the parade ground. Winchelsea was bombed and strafed several times by German planes, and suffered civilian casualties, including four deaths. One of the Bofors guns on Strand Hill caused an attacking German fighter to fly into electricity cables along Sea Road with gruesome consequences: the cables cut off the canopy and pilot’s head. Five sons of Winchelsea died on active service in the Second World War --- Donald Alford, George Cook, Robert Jenkins, Anthony Stuart and Harry Willeard. Their names were added to the nine names from the First World War on the war memorial in the churchyard --- Archibald Baldwin, William Freeman, Robert Griffin, Henry Patch, Noel Patch, Frederick Penny, George Snashall, Norman Streeton and Edward Watson. Attribution: The bulk of the information in this history is quite shamelessly derived from two sources: “New Winchelsea Sussex: a medieval port town” by David and Barbara Martin (with contributions from Jill Eddison, David Rudling and David Sylvester, and “Port of Stranded Pride” by Malcolm Pratt. The Martins are the foremost archaeologists of medieval Winchelsea and Malcolm Pratt is the Clerk to the Corporation and an acknowledged authority on the later history of the town. We are very grateful to David Martin and Archaeology South East for permission to reproduce many maps and plans. www.winchelsea.net/visiting/winchelsea_history_pt21.htm
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Historical Deaths: Famous Deaths on 6 Mar
Famous Deaths on 6 Mar1252 - Saint Rose of Viterbo, Italian saint (b. 1235)1490 - Ivan the Young, Ruler of Tver (b.
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