Wilmington Insurrection of 1898
The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898, also known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 or the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, occurred in Wilmington, North Carolina starting on November 10, 1898 into the following days; it is considered a turning point in North Carolina politics following Reconstruction. Originally described as a race riot, it is now observed as a coup d'etat with insurgents having overthrown the legitimately elected local government, the only such event in United States history.
Two days after the election of a Fusionist white Mayor and biracial city council, Democratic Party white supremacists illegally seized power from the elected government. More than 1500 white men participated in an attack on the black newspaper, burning down the building. They ran officials and community leaders out of the city, and killed many blacks in widespread attacks, but especially destroyed the Brooklyn neighborhood. They took photographs of each other during the events. The Wilmington Light Infantry (WLI) and federal Naval Reserves, told to quell the riot, used rapid-fire weapons and killed several black men in the Brooklyn neighborhood. Both black and white residents later appealed for help after the riot to President William McKinley, who did not respond. More than 2,000 blacks left the city permanently, turning it from a black-majority to a white-majority city.
In the 1990s, a grassroots movement arose in the city to acknowledge and discuss the events more openly, and try to reconcile the different accounts of what happened, similar to efforts in Florida and Oklahoma to recognize the early 20th-century race riots of Rosewood and Tulsa, respectively. The city planned events around the insurrection's centennial in 1998, and numerous residents took part in discussions and education events. In 2000 the state legislature authorized a commission to produce a history of the events and to evaluate the economic impact and costs to black residents, with consideration of reparation for descendants of victims. Its report was completed in 2006.

This is an excerpt from the article Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 from the Wikipedia free encyclopedia. A list of authors is available at Wikipedia.
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Wilmington Riot - PBS
In 1898, Wilmington, North Carolina, located in eastern Carolina, where the Cape Fear River enters into the Atlantic Ocean, was a prosperous port town. Almost ...
www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_events_riot.html
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Rev. Charles S. Morris Describes The Wilmington Massacre of 1898
Wilmington Mob Long termed a “race riot,” the turmoil that enveloped Wilmington, North Carolina on November 10, 1898 is now called an armed insurrection.
www.blackpast.org/1898-rev-charles-s-morris-describes-wilmington-massacre-1898
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Early African American Perspectives on the Wilmington Race ...
On Thursday, November 10, 1898, Colonel Alfred Moore Waddell, a Democratic leader in Wilmington, North Carolina mustered a white mob to retaliate for a controversial ...
docsouth.unc.edu/highlights/riots_1898.html
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Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Wilmington Coup d'Etat of 1898, also known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 or the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, occurred in Wilmington, North ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilmington_Insurrection_of_1898
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America's Black Holocaust Museum | Wilmington Insurrection of 1898
Nov 10, 2012 ... The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898, also known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 or the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, occurred in ...
abhmuseum.org/2012/11/wilmington-insurrection-of-1898/
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How The Only Coup D'Etat In U.S. History Unfolded : NPR
Aug 17, 2008 ... In 1898, armed white supremacists overthrew the elected local government in Wilmington, N.C. The coup — the only one in U.S. history — was ...
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Wilmington, North Carolina Report details 1898 racist terror campaign
Feb 1, 2006 ... The insurrection inspired political upheaval across North Carolina and ... To understand the significance of the setback in 1898 in Wilmington, ...
www.pslweb.org/liberationnews/news/06-02-01-report-details-racist-terror-cam.html
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1898 Wilmington Race Riot - Final Report, May 31, 2006
May 31, 2006 ... Front Matter, Wilmington Race Riot Commission — North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources ... MAP: Fire Stations in Wilmington, 1898.
www.history.ncdcr.gov/1898-wrrc/report/report.htm
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The Horrendous Massacre of 1898 - TonieTate - HubPages
Jan 18, 2010 ... Democracy Betrayed: The Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and Its Legacy ... Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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When Democracy Died in Wilmington, N.C. - New York Times
Jan 8, 2006 ... The report, by the Wilmington Race Riot Commission, has thrown a klieg light ... that were staged in Wilmington, N.C., in 1898 - and that still have an evident ... The proponents of the insurrection found ready allies in the press ...
www.nytimes.com/2006/01/08/opinion/08sun3.html
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Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Wilmington Coup d'Etat of 1898, also known as the Wilmington ... The city planned events around the insurrection's centennial in 1998, and .... the African- American community, UNC-Wilmington's university faculty, and civil rights activists.
The Wilmington Rebellion - History Engine - University of Richmond
In November of 1898, the population of Wilmington North Carolina was composed of 8,000 white men and 25,000 black men. Many blacks were employed ...
[PDF]1898 Wilmington Race Riot Report - North Carolina Office of ...
May 31, 2006 ... e racial violence of November 10, 1898, in Wilmington precipitated an armed .... at a complete record of the 1898 Wilmington race and political rebellion be .... University – what has become known as the “Dunning School” ...
Wilmington Riot - PBS
In 1898, Wilmington, North Carolina, located in eastern Carolina, where the Cape Fear River enters into the Atlantic Ocean, was a prosperous port town. Almost ...
America's Black Holocaust Museum | Wilmington Insurrection of 1898
Nov 10, 2012 ... The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898, also known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 or the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, occurred in ...
Rev. Charles S. Morris Describes The Wilmington Massacre of 1898
Wilmington Mob Long termed a “race riot,” the turmoil that enveloped Wilmington, North Carolina on November 10, 1898 is now called an armed insurrection.
Wilmington Race Riot | NCpedia
Jan 1, 2006 ... 1898 by the Wilmington Daily Record, an African American newspaper edited by Alexander Manly. ... Because of the perceived success of the insurrection, Wilmington blacks ... Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.
Democracy Betrayed: The Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and Its ...
Democracy Betrayed: The Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and Its Legacy [David S. ... Research Scholar at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University, ... or "a white supremacist insurrection against a legitimately elected interracial ...
Early African American Perspectives on the Wilmington Race Riots ...
On Thursday, November 10, 1898, Colonel Alfred Moore Waddell, a Democratic leader in Wilmington, North Carolina mustered a white mob to retaliate for a ...
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Wilmington Insurrection Of 1898
Wilmington Insurrection Of 1898
Jesse Russell, Ronald Cohn, 2012
The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898, also known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 or the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, occurred in Wilmington, North Carolina on November 10, 1898 and following days; it is considered a turning point in ...
Democracy Betrayed: The Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and Its ...
Democracy Betrayed: The Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and Its ...
David S. Cecelski, Timothy B. Tyson, 1998
The Wilmington Race Riot of 1898 and Its Legacy David S. Cecelski, Timothy B. Tyson ... Collection, New Hanover County Public Library, Wilmington, N.C.; Harry Hayden, The Story of the Wilmington Rebellion (n.p., 1936); Harry John Hayden,  ...
Upbuilding Black Durham: Gender, Class, and Black Community ...
Upbuilding Black Durham: Gender, Class, and Black Community ...
Leslie Brown, 2008
GeneralJulian S. Carr Sr. to Captain W. K. Parrish, 7 September 1898, WKPP. Durham Daily Sun, 4, 7 November 1898; Gilmore, Gender andJim Crow, 114. Gilmore, Gender andJim Crow, 114. Hayden, Story of the Wilmington Rebellion, 31.
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Wilmington Insurrection of 1898
Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow . Jim Crow Stories . The Wilmington Riot | PBS
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(1898) Rev. Charles S. Morris Describes The Wilmington Massacre of 1898 | The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed
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Wilmington Race Riot 1898 - an album on Flickr
The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898, also known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898 or the Wilmington Race Riot of 1898, occurred in Wilmington, North Carolina, on November 10, 1898, and following days; it is considered a turning point in North Carolina politics following Reconstruction. Originally labeled a race riot, it is now also termed a coup d'etat, as insurrectionists displaced the elected local government. This event is the only instance of a municipal government being overthrown in US history. Wilmington, then the largest city in the state, had a majority-black population, numerous black professionals and a rising middle class, and a strong, biracial Republican Party. Because Wilmington was a black-majority city, its election was followed statewide. Despite the Democrats' inflammatory rhetoric in support of white supremacy, and an extensive Red Shirt campaign of intimidation against opponents, a biracial fusionist government was elected to office in Wilmington on November 8, 1898. During the election campaign, whites had criticized Alexander Manly, editor of Wilmington's Daily Record, the state's only black-owned newspaper, and wanted to close him down. After the election, whites created a Committee of Twenty-Five, all white supremacists, and presented their demands to the Committee of Colored Citizens (CCC), a group of politicians and leaders of the African-American community. Specifically, the whites wanted a promise that Manly would be evicted. The CCC was supposed to respond on November 10, 1898. When Alfred Moore Waddell and the Committee had not received a response by 7:30 am he gathered a group of white businessmen and Confederate veterans at the Wilmington Light Infantry armory. By 8:00 am, Waddell led the armed group to the Daily Record office, where they destroyed the equipment and burned down the building of the only African-American newspaper in the state. Democratic white supremacists illegally seized power from an elected government, running officials out of the city, and killing many blacks in widespread attacks. Among their weapons, they used a Gatling gun mounted on a wagon. Although residents appealed for help to Governor Daniel Lindsay Russell and President William McKinley, they did nothing in response. By this time, Manly, along with many others, had hidden or fled Wilmington for safety. Throughout the rest of the day, rioting and gunfire took place throughout Wilmington. The insurrectionists drove political and business leaders from the town. The estimated number of deaths ranges from six to 100, all blacks. Because of incomplete records by the hospital, churches and coroner's office, the number of people killed remains uncertain, but only blacks died. Hundreds fled the town to take shelter in nearby swamps. After the violence settled, so many blacks left Wilmington that the demographics changed. Waddell and his mob forced white Republican Mayor Silas P. Wright and other members of the city government (both black and white) to resign. (Their terms lasted until 1899). They installed a new city council that elected Waddell to take over as mayor by 4 pm that day. Subsequent to Waddell's usurping power, the Democratic state legislators (see North Carolina General Assembly of 1899-1900) passed the first Jim Crow laws for North Carolina. The Democrats had essentially created martial law for African Americans in North Carolina, setting an example that had influence beyond the state's borders for at least fifty years. The legislature circumscribed federal rights which blacks had secured in constitutional amendments after the Civil War; for instance, by imposing poll taxes and literacy tests, the legislators sharply reduced voting by most blacks. Not until the African-American Civil Rights Movement and passage of national laws several generations later would African Americans would regain their civil rights in North Carolina. (The above summary partially quotes a 'Wilmington Insurrection of 1898' Wikipedia entry) For more information and details, please see the following link to the Wilmington Race Riot Commission's website and research report: www.history.ncdcr.gov/1898-wrrc/
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The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 (formerly called a race riot). The only such coup d’état in United States history. « Our Own Voices
Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 Main article: Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 From an article in Wikipediahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilmington,_North_Carolina#Wilmington_Insurrection_of_1898 The Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 (formerly called a race riot) occurred as a result of the racially charged political conflict that had occurred in the decades after the Civil War and efforts to establish white supremacy. In the 1870s, the Red Shirts, a white paramilitary organization, used violence and intimidation to suppress black voting, helping Democrats to regain power in the state legislature and end Reconstruction.
www.ourownvoices.com/?p=18500
Wilmington Insurrection Of 1898 Espnhs - ESPN
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The Horrendous Massacre of 1898
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NC Flix: N.C Filmmaker Allen Weiss tackles the 1898 Wilmington Uprising
ncflix.blogspot.com/2013/01/nc-filmmaker-allen-weiss-tackles-1898.html
African American News and Genealogy: Report Calls 1898 N.C. Riot an Insurrection
The events of November 10, 1898, in Wilmington constitute a turning point in North Carolina history. By force, a white mob seized the reins of government in the port city and, in so doing, destroyed the local black-owned newspaper office and terrorized the African American community.
africanamericangenealogy.blogspot.com/2005/12/report-calls-1898-nc-riot-insurrection.html
Wilmington's 1898 Racial Conflict | Alternative
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